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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 167 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 31 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 13 3 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Short studies of American authors 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 7 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Longfellow or search for Longfellow in all documents.

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ty is provincial toryism. Persons freshly returned from Europe, who have hearts, are at first disturbed by it, then straightway adopt it. Witness the C——'s. Longfellow, referring to the proneness of some persons to find little good in their own country after returning from Europe, wrote in his diary, Oct. 17, 1847: Sumner to d he suffered no reproach or loss of support from the mass of his party in the city; and the willing agents in its execution lost no favor, social or political. Longfellow wrote at this time, Sept. 15, 1850, in his diary:— The day has been blackened to me by reading of the passage of the Fugitive Slave bill in the House, Elig his review of Spanish literature, it is doing no injustice to Ticknor's rank in letters to say, that, unlike his contemporaries in Boston,—Bancroft, Prescott, Longfellow, and Holmes,—he has as an author left nothing of permanent interest to mankind. His social success abroad has been noted as a mystery, and referred, not to
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
ame and Glory. Works, vol. II. pp. 1-54. Longfellow refers to the praise of the oration in his lmore so, than any other haunt of my life. Longfellow's Life, vol. II. p. 92. The poet in his rep at Sumner's election as senator. Letter to Longfellow, May 18, 1851. Longfellow's Life, vol. II.Longfellow's Life, vol. II. p. 195. but Sumner, as senator, had the satisfaction, a few years later, of voting for his confirmall be explained elsewhere, but his visits to Longfellow were kept up with the same frequency as befoumner and Howe to come to Cambridge and join Longfellow and himself in keeping it alive. Between Drelcome with the family of W. H. Prescott, Longfellow in his diary, May 20, 1846, gives an accounttorian at his country home at Pepperell. To Longfellow and Prescott Sumner always brought foreign vccursed passport system be abolished? To Longfellow, from Fishkill on the Hudson, September 15: e the genius of Spain. Sumner, writing to Longfellow from Montpellier, France, Jan. 24, 1859, sai[14 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 31: the prison—discipline debates in Tremont Temple.—1846-1847. (search)
s in this country and abroad, and reminded Dwight of those which he had encountered within the year at the Frankfort Congress and elsewhere in Europe. Sumner made another speech, occupying two hours, on June 18, in which he reviewed the debate. Works, vol. i. pp. 486-529. The speech fills six columns of the Semi-Weekly Courier, July 5, 1847. Dr. Julius wrote from Berlin of this speech, It is excellent,—one of the most temperate, lucid, and convincing I have ever read in any debate. Longfellow wrote in his journal, June 18, 1847: Went to town to hear Sumner before the Prison Discipline Society. He made a very strong, manly speech. It was a kind of demolition of the Bastile and of——. The blank is for Eliot and Dwight. It repeated much that he had already said. The report, as written out by him, probably does not follow very closely his argument on that evening, but includes the remarks on different evenings which he particularly desired to have preserved. He did not undertak<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
he tradition is that he was obliged to select his guests with care when Sumner was invited, lest the feast should be marred by unseemly behavior on their part. Longfellow and his wife, made of far finer mould than their kin or their class, were, notwithstanding their connection with Mr. Appleton, as devotedly attached to Sumner aifest in their composition, and could have been no surprise to the Speaker. Palfrey, against whom a great clamor arose among the partisan Whigs of Boston, Longfellow wrote in his diary, Dec. 12, 1847: Sumner joined us at dinner. We talked over Palfrey's vote against Winthrop, which is making a tempest in the Boston tea-pot. The act partakes somewhat of the heroic. Longfellow's Life, vol. II. p. 101. justified his vote in a formal statement two years later. A Letter to a Friend, 1850, pp. 12, 13. When Winthrop was a candidate for re-election in December, 1849, the Free Soil members, then increased to nine, again set up their objections to him,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
disturbed,—at Lyceum Hall, Cambridge, in the midst of the associations of his youth; where the students, some Southern, and others reflecting the sentiments of the ruling class in Boston, interrupted him with hisses and coarse exclamations. Longfellow's Life, vol. II. p. 127. He bore the rudeness well, till at length he singled out the leader of the disturbance, who had made himself conspicuous by loud expressions of contempt at the speaker's comments on Taylor, and said: The young man who acter and his favorable situation in a community removed from the influence of Boston capital, perhaps brought more votes to the party than any one of the leaders See, for sketches of the Free Soil leaders, Boston Republican, Oct. 31, 1849. Longfellow's diary illustrates Sumner's tone of mind at this time:— June 24, 1848. Dined in town. Saw Sumner surrounded by his captains, Adams, Allen, and Phillips They are in great fervor touching their Anti-Taylor-and-Cass meeting in Worcester.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
people of Massachusetts. It was in conflict with the principles they had uniformly maintained, as well as with his general course as the representative of the State. See Sumner's letter to John Bigelow, May 22, 1850, post, p. 215. Still, Webster's efforts in Massachusetts in 1846 and 1847 to prevent slavery becoming the main political issue, and his lukewarm censures of the Mexican War, as well as his Creole letter of an earlier period, had already weakened Sumner's confidence in him. Longfellow was hardly surprised at the speech of March 7. He wrote in his journal, March 9, 1850: Yet what has there been in Webster's life to lead us to think that he would take any high moral ground on this slavery question? He was not, like Clay, the natural supporter of compromise. he wrote July 21, 1848: You need not fear that I shall vote for any compromises, or do anything inconsistent with the past. Curtis's Life of Webster, vol. II. p. 342. He had repeatedly affirmed his convictions ag
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
e indeed divided; Dr. Convers Francis and Longfellow were anti-Compromise. Longfellow's Life, voLongfellow's Life, vol. II. p. 192. but the activity there was on Webster's side. Felton was his partisan. Bowen, in tugh and spirited speech on that side. To Longfellow, January 24:— Dear Henry,—Whittier is xternal pressure which he could not resist. Longfellow wrote in his diary, April 8, 1850: Felton islen, fallen, fallen from his high estate! Longfellow's diary, March 9, 1850. Palfrey compared hims who had been chosen by the Legislature; Longfellow was disappointed and sad, and wrote to Sumne any great faith in your perfidious allies. Longfellow's Life, vol. II. p. 187. but the practical y after, he left the house and went out to Mr. Longfellow's, where he passed that afternoon and the y track then existing, across the Common, to Longfellow's. The writer said to Sumner on the way, Thiical revolution of the preceding year. To Longfellow, may 8:— I cannot repress me delight i[2 more...
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
—with his mother and sister at the family home, and with Howe and Longfellow. Howe wrote to him: You are now to be lost to us; and though whe for comfort and sympathy when I am sad. God bless and keep you! Longfellow wrote in his diary, November 23:— Sumner takes his last din Author of the Dictionary of the English Language,—a neighbor of Longfellow, and a good friend of Sumner. In New York Sumner made a few c With constant love to mother and yourself, Charles. dearest Longfellow,—I could not speak to you as we parted,—my soul was too full; only I wept like a child,—I could not help it: first in parting with Longfellow, next in parting with you, and lastly as I left my mother and sist. They are bigoted without being fanatical. Sumner wrote to Longfellow, December 9:— Shields is now speaking. Everybody has treatheir pleasure at the manner in which he had acquitted himself, Longfellow was pleased with the speech, as his diary (Jan. 31, 1852)
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
, June 6.) At Mr. Blair's he read Leopardi. Longfellow's Journal and Letters, vol. II. p. 281. Amo! Such will be the sentiment of posterity. Longfellow wrote in his diary, May 24: O Southern chiva toast, The re-election of Charles Sumner. (Longfellow's Journal and Letters, vol. II. p. 280.) In alarmed. He wrote hopefully, July 18, to Longfellow (Longfellow's Life, vol. III. p. 47), but aLongfellow's Life, vol. III. p. 47), but an ill turn came immediately after. E. L. Pierce sought him at Cape May, July 21-23, and found him iner wrote to E. L. Pierce, November 15, from Longfellow's: I am obliged by your Kind sympathy.January 15 (leader written by E. L. Pierce). Longfellow wrote in his diary: There is no mistaking thned four months at home, with many visits to Longfellow at Cambridge, taking systematic exercise and avoiding excitement. Longfellow wrote in his diary, November 2: Sumner arrived just as we were spleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography. Longfellow, at whose house Sumner was the day after Bro[3 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
ges also with them as with him. He wrote to Longfellow, June 26: The lapse of nineteen years is veribed his visit to Tocqueville in a letter to Longfellow, Aug. 18, 1857. Longfellow's Life, vol. IILongfellow's Life, vol. III. pp. 50, 51. August 15. At six o'clock this morning took the diligence for Caen (some eighty mout to Scaleby Hall (seven miles) to call on Longfellow's correspondent, Miss Farrar; she was gone; arlisle's room. Mr. Grey sang four songs of Longfellow,— Excelsior, The Bridge, The rainy day, and us cheers his appearance on the platform, Longfellow's Life, vol. II. p. 310. and insisted, in sse in New York, at his home in Boston, or at Longfellow's in Cambridge. At this time he turned toys in the Astor Library ; Sumner wrote to Longfellow, March 3: Each day I go to the Astor Libraryhe wearied out any one who joined him in it. Longfellow wrote in his diary, Jan. 21, 1858:-- Weurse of treatment to resort. In a letter to Longfellow, May 10, from Mr. Furness's, he stated his p
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