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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 167 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 50 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 31 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 13 3 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Short studies of American authors 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 7 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Russell Lowell, Among my books. You can also browse the collection for Longfellow or search for Longfellow in all documents.

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James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Dante. (search)
1814, six since 1850, beside several of the Inferno singly. Of these that of Longfellow is the best. It is only within the last twenty years, however, that the studdevote a special course of illustrative lectures to Dante; he was followed by Longfellow, whose lectures, illustrated by admirable translations, are remembered with gt and hands To God attributes, and means something else. Paradiso, IV. 40-45 (Longfellow's version). Whoever has studied medieval art in any of its branches need not ions won by prayer availed, as better expressing Ne la impetrare spirazion. Mr. Longfellow's translation is so admirable for its exactness as well as its beauty that ries out for death to come a second time and ease him of his sufferings. Mr. Longfellow'sfor, like the Italian per, gives us the same privilege of election. We frthe right-hand wheel Faith, Hope, and Charity. (Purgatorio, XXIX. 121.) Mr. Longfellow has translated the last verse literally. The meaning is, More than a thous
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Spenser (search)
upright (as the French critic Rivarol said of Dante) with the bare help of the substantive and verb, is worth acres of this dead cord-wood piled stick on stick, a boundless continuity of dryness. I would rather have written that half-stanza of Longfellow's, in the Wreck of the Hesperus, of the billow that swept her crew like icicles from her deck, than all Gawain Douglas's tedious enumeration of meteorological phenomena put together. A real landscape is never tiresome; it never presents itselfo in aere ed in acqua la schiuma. Inferno, XXIV. 46-52. For sitting upon down, Or under quilt, one cometh not to fame, Withouten which whoso his life consumeth Such vestige leaveth of himself on earth As smoke in air or in the water foam. Longfellow. It shows how little Dante was read during the last century that none of the commentators on Spenser notice his most important obligations to the great Tuscan. Whoso in pomp of proud estate, quoth she, Does swim, and bathes himself in