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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harper's Ferry, (search)
no effort at defence; and when, early on the 15th, no less than nine bat- Movements around Harper's Ferry, from Sept. 10 to 17, 1862. A, A. Jackson's march from Frederick to Sharpsburg.D, D. Walker's march from Monocacy to Sharpsburg. B, B. Longstreet's march from Frederick to Sharpsburg.E, E. Confederate position at Antietam. C, C. McLaws and Anderson's march from Frederick to Sharpsburg.H, H. Franklin's march from Pleasant Valley to Antietam. Franklin followed the same route as McLaws from Frederick to Pleasant Valley; the remainder of the Union Army that of Longstreet from Frederick to Boonesboro, and thence to the Antietam. The arrows show the direction of the march. Where two or more letters come together, it indicates that the several bodies followed the same route. Burning of the arsenal, Harper's Ferry teries opened upon the garrison, he displayed a white flag. Before it was seen by the Confederates, one of their shots had killed him. The post was surrendered,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hood, John Bell 1831-1879 (search)
es in 1861, receiving the appointment of brigadier-general. He joined Twiggs in betraying the army in Texas into the hands of the Confederates. He was promoted to major-general in 1862, and John Bell Hood. commanded the largest division of Longstreet's corps at Gettysburg. He lost a leg at Chickamauga. In the Atlanta campaign in 1864 he was with Longstreet, and superseded Johnston in command of the army at Atlanta in July. He invaded Tennessee late in that year; was defeated at NashvilleLongstreet, and superseded Johnston in command of the army at Atlanta in July. He invaded Tennessee late in that year; was defeated at Nashville; driven into Alabama, and was relieved of command by Gen. Richard Taylor. He died in New Orleans, Aug. 30, 1879. Instructed by the chief of the Confederacy to draw Sherman out of Georgia, for his presence was creating great disaffection to the Confederate cause, Hood, in October, 1864, moved rapidly towards Tennessee, threatening important points on the railway. Sherman followed as rapidly, and, by forced marches, saved Kingston (Oct. 10), which was one of the threatened places. Hood turn
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Siege of Knoxville, (search)
Knoxville, Sept. 3, 1863. The Confederate General Buckner, upon his advance, evacuated east Tennessee and joined Bragg at Chattanooga. Early in November, General Longstreet, with 16,000 men, advanced against Knoxville. On the 14th he crossed the Tennessee. Burnside repulsed him on the 16th at Campbell's Station, gaining time to concentrate his army in Knoxville. Longstreet advanced, laid siege to the town, and assaulted it twice (Nov. 18 and 29), but was repulsed. Meantime Grant had defeated Bragg at Chattanooga, and Sherman, with 25,000 men, was on the way to relieve Knoxville. Longstreet, compelled to raise the siege, retired up the Holston River (Nov. 18 and 29), but was repulsed. Meantime Grant had defeated Bragg at Chattanooga, and Sherman, with 25,000 men, was on the way to relieve Knoxville. Longstreet, compelled to raise the siege, retired up the Holston River, but did not entirely abandon east Tennessee until the next spring, when he again joined Lee in Virginia.