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The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Combined movement on Richmond — the enemy on the Southside — fight at Chester — the great cavalry Raid, &c. (search)
s from our latest New York files: The movement on Richmond. The New York Herald, of the 4th, in an editorial summary of the situation, says: The rebel leaders at Richmond evidently fear that, while strengthening our army on the Rapidan Gen Grant has not weakened the victorious army at Chattanooga. Jeff Davis, therefore may well be some what uneasy concerning the safety of Atlanta, while all the help that he can muster is required for the defence of Richmond. The withdrawal of Longstreet from East Tennessee is of itself equal to a heavy reinforcement of Gen Thomas, and it is probable that Gen Sherman — Gen Grant's chief in command in the West--will take good care that no further reinforcements from Georgia are sent forward to Gen Lee. Thus it will be seen that in securing Chattanooga we head off the enemy to a very great extent on their interior lines of communication. While we were not further advanced in the West than Nashville or Murfreesboro', it was almost impo
An incident of Gen. Longstreet. --During the Mexican campaign, Lieut. Gen Longstreet was in command of a company of regulars, and while engaged in one of the battles which marked that struggle,Lieut. Gen Longstreet was in command of a company of regulars, and while engaged in one of the battles which marked that struggle, observed a Mexican taking deliberate aim at him from behind the corner of a house. The ball whistled by without injury. Longstreet himself had a musket, and on the re appearance of the Mexican, boLongstreet himself had a musket, and on the re appearance of the Mexican, both fired almost simultaneously, and without effect. The General now recalled to mind a recommendation of his father, Judge Longstreet, the author of the famous "Georgia Scenes"--which was,!"Use bucksJudge Longstreet, the author of the famous "Georgia Scenes"--which was,!"Use buckshot in close quarters;" and taking from his cartridge box a bullet he deliberately seated himself on the ground, and with the aid of a rock and his pocket knife, cut the ball into sings and reloaded. ommit the wall to the broad sea of public circulation. Since that time probably a volume of incidents equally characteristic of the indifference of General Longstreet under fire might be collected.