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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 999 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 382 26 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 379 15 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 288 22 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 283 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 243 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 233 43 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 210 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 200 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 186 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Longstreet or search for Longstreet in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
oods intervening. Just across the creek was Longstreet's brigade, about 1400 strong, occupying the These tactics were repeated several times, Longstreet meanwhile attempting to cross some of his meadvances, had opened fire while still behind Longstreet's line. This fire in the rear threw Longstrand Capt. Squires called for reenforcement. Longstreet had no more artillery available, and orderef in readiness on the south side. Jones and Longstreet crossed their brigades and took position on early in the morning had been discovered by Longstreet's scouts. He writes of it in his book (pagen order toward the right were Cocke, Bonham, Longstreet, and Early, south of the Run; Jones north ofand Holmes's brigades already on the march. Longstreet, at his own request by courier, was authoriz now across Stone Bridge, as has been told. Longstreet, with superfluous caution, left one regiment regiments)32326 Jones (3 regiments)135770 Longstreet (4 regiments)21214 Cocke (3 2/2,regiments)2[14 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 3: fall and winter of 1861 (search)
hnston was killed as he was about to grasp a victory. Beauregard was not yet immune to attacks of overcaution, the bane of new commanders, and his excellent chance to win a great success was lost. He recalled his attack just at the critical moment when it gave every promise of developing a panic among the enemy. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston at this time had organized his army into four divisions, two of four brigades each, commanded by Van Dorn and G. W. Smith; and two of five each, under Longstreet and E. Kirby Smith. These 18 brigades averaged about four regiments, and the regiments averaged about 500 men each. Besides these there were other troops under Jackson in the valley and under Holmes near Acquia. The total effective strength on February 28, 1862, was 47,617, with about 175 guns. Early in March the Federal army was organized into five army corps under McDowell, Sumner, Heintzelman, Keyes, and Banks. Each corps was generally composed of three divisions, each division o
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 4: Yorktown and Williamsburg (search)
A conference was called, which included Lee, Longstreet, G. W. Smith, and the Sec. of War, Randolph.. 15 he went to Yorktown, taking Smith's and Longstreet's divisions, which gave him a total force oflieved by Anderson's and Pryor's brigades of Longstreet's division. That night we stayed at Willi To hold the enemy in check at Williamsburg, Longstreet retained his whole division of six brigades gradually increased in volume. The whole of Longstreet's division was brought up, and advanced uponohnston, who had left the battle entirely to Longstreet's direction, referred it to the latter. LonLongstreet very properly refused to give permission, as we fought only to cover our retreat up the Pen was a soldier of the same type. He visited Longstreet in person, and Longstreet now weakly yielded had rained nearly all day, and on our right Longstreet simply kept back the enemy's advance by fire39. The Confederate casualties [reported by Longstreet only] were: officers 102, men 1458, total 15[1 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 5: Seven Pines or fair Oaks (search)
he south side of the Chickahominy (McLaws's, Longstreet's, D. H. Hill's, and Huger's) would be held o Johnston to play, and in a conference with Longstreet during the afternoon of May 30, the battle fcamped farther up the Nine Mile road. After Longstreet left Johnston's headquarters, the rain havinapt. Beckham, down the Nine Mile to overtake Longstreet and learn the cause of any delay. Beckham fthere were equally disparaging statements by Longstreet. General Longstreet, unwilling to make a and harbors. Rains fought on the left. Had Longstreet's division that morning not gone astray, all. Kemper's brigade also arrived, brought by Longstreet to Hill's aid. It came upon the field, but ton the Nine Mile road of the six brigades of Longstreet. Whiting's five brigades, however, were at on the railroad all day Pickett's brigade of Longstreet's division, sent there by Longstreet before e two it was expected to double him up. Then Longstreet was to cross on the Mechanicsville bridge, a[40 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
and the passage across the bridge opened, Gen. Longstreet, with his division and that of Gen. D. H.oving to the support of Gen. Jackson, and Gen. Longstreet supporting Gen. A. P. Hill. The four divat his headquarters to arrange all details. Longstreet had asked Jackson to fix the date on which tFor with haste and poor judgment Davis, Lee, Longstreet, and the two Hills, not content to merely cafronted the Federal right. A. P. Hill, with Longstreet in reserve, confronted their left. Porteron's] came a little earlier than those under Longstreet and A. P. Hill, but were more cautious, and,ne in that direction. Under this impression Longstreet was held back until this movement should comecessity, at length, forced Lee to call upon Longstreet's division to aid A. P. Hill. Three brigadesinished, were still holding their lines, and Longstreet was all in position. It was, practically, access by Whiting's two brigades supported by Longstreet on our extreme right, by Lawton's and Winder[7 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 8 (search)
the battle-field of the 27th, A. P. Hill and Longstreet were ordered to cross the Chickahominy at Neand Huger, — while Lee himself with Jackson, Longstreet, and A. P. Hill, moving swiftly around the rell, and did nothing. Lee, having gone with Longstreet and A. P. Hill, lost touch of all three, — Jto the Darbytown road to join A. P. Hill and Longstreet. Soon after being left alone, finding that evere. On the Confederate side, Lee, with Longstreet and Hill, in a field of broom-grass and smaleby prevent an immediate junction between Gen. Longstreet and myself. We found the bridge destroyethe White Oak crossing we heard the noise of Longstreet's battle at Frazier's Farm, and Capt. or Ma his splendid prize slip through his hands. Longstreet and A. P. Hill struck the enemy at Frazier'sand the nation. We may now return to Lee, Longstreet, and A. P. Hill at Frazier's Farm or Glendalcreased the fire of one of their batteries. Longstreet ordered Jenkins, second to none in either co[8 more...]<
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
him whipped. Reconnoissance, ordered by Longstreet on the right, found a position favorable if eld on the River road, and was not engaged. Longstreet and Hill were in reserve behind Magruder; anock Lee abandoned his intention to assault. Longstreet was informed, His report says, — A littleeased. Shortly before this, Lee had taken Longstreet and ridden over to our left in search of som A short reconnoissance induced Lee to order Longstreet at once to move his own division and Hill's nly been severely engaged at Gaines Mill. Longstreet, with A. P. Hill's and his own divisions, wahow important it was to hold the ground till Longstreet arrived. The enemy's infantry advanced, a kept up its fire. I just then learned that Longstreet had taken the wrong road and was then at Nan with Franklin's division. The next morning Longstreet was up with his own and A. P. Hill's divisio did not reach the field until noon, and, as Longstreet ranked Jackson, he ordered the enemy's picke[10 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 10: Cedar Mountain (search)
izations, though leaving us still greatly behind the example long before set us by the enemy. Longstreet and Jackson were still but major-generals commanding divisions, but each now habitually commanown by the names of new commanders. Thus, Jackson's old division now became Taliaferro's, and Longstreet's division became Pickett's, while Longstreet and Jackson each commanded a Wing, so called. Longstreet and Jackson each commanded a Wing, so called. It was not until another brief rest in October, after the battle of Sharpsburg, that Longstreet and Jackson were made lieutenant-generals, and the whole army was definitely organized into corps. SoLongstreet and Jackson were made lieutenant-generals, and the whole army was definitely organized into corps. Some improvement was also made in our armament by the guns and rifled muskets captured during the Seven Days, and my reserve ordnance train was enlarged. Lines of light earthworks were constructed, pros would have given the Confederates the very opportunity desired. On Aug. 13, Lee had ordered Longstreet and Hood, with 12 brigades, to proceed by rail to Gordonsville, and, on the 14th, he also orde
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
ope versus Porter. Kearny and Reno attack. Longstreet takes position. Longstreet meets King. Pop, while Jackson is burning Manassas, Lee and Longstreet are in bivouac at White Plains, 24 miles wes desire now to conceal his whereabouts until Longstreet was near, yet one of his brigadiers, Col. Joents. It is now time to return to Lee and Longstreet, who bivouacked between White Plains and Thoenforcements at hand and he had in his front Longstreet's corps of nearly 25,000. His course was prf a gun, several flags, and some prisoners. Longstreet then withdrew his attacking brigades back toance preparatory to an attack at dawn, which Longstreet had suggested as better than one so late in ckson's men say that they were going to join Longstreet. Porter had sent the man to Pope, with a meartillery was able to take in flank those of Longstreet's forces which led the assault upon the Henry hill. Secondly, three of Longstreet's brigades were lost from his attack from looseness of organi[43 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
son, while the other half, under himself and Longstreet, was sent by railroad to Chattanooga via Briand even with musketry, command the town. Longstreet, with the two divisions of D. R. Jones and E For it will be seen that this separation of Longstreet by 13 miles from D. H. Hill, caused the lossn was necessary. There was no need to place Longstreet as far away even as Boonsboro. A safer moven the morning to reenforce Hill, and Lee and Longstreet returned with them to Turner's Gap. It waflict. Hill, in his report, says: — Had Longstreet's division been with mine at daylight in theen fought. On the arrival of the head of Longstreet's column, Evans was sent to the left to supp the top they were at once sharply engaged. Longstreet writes:— They were put in as they arriveted at the foot of the mountain, and thither Longstreet and Hill repaired as the firing ceased. Hil the reserve ordnance train, of 45 wagons of Longstreet's corps. It is now necessary to describe [5 more...]<
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