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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 999 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 382 26 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 379 15 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 288 22 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 283 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 243 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 233 43 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 210 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 200 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 186 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Longstreet or search for Longstreet in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarks of Captain John Lamb on March 24, 1899, at Richmond, Virginia, in the Hall of R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V. In accepting, on behalf of the Camp, the portrait of General Thomas T. Munford, C. S. Cavalry. (search)
far as the nature of the densely wooded country would permit, in the fights around Richmond. At White Oak Swamp, where Jackson was detained a whole day, while Longstreet and A. P. Hill were delivering the fearful battle of Frazier's Farm, Colonel Munford was called upon to perform one of those difficult tasks that often fall to tting out. Had Munford's suggestion been followed, Franklin would have been forced back to where Heintzelman and McCall were barely holding their own against Longstreet and A. P. Hill. The Federal forces, disputing the passage of Fisher's Run by Armistead and Mahone, would have been forced to fall back, and Huger's whole division would have reinforced Longstreet; while Magruder at Timberlake's store, on the Darbytown Road, at two o'clock, the 30th, was within two hours march of Glendale. To one who understands the topography of this country it looks as if the very stars in their courses fought against us on the fateful 30th of June, 1862. A month o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
and made it impossible. The next thing that I remember was that no reinforcements came and that the Yankees came over the works and we got, at least I did. I was slightly wounded in the face and in the arm, and found it somewhat difficult to jump what looked to me a ten rail fence, but I managed this all the same. When I got my breath about a quarter of a mile from the field, I saw General Lee riding unattended, and after a few minutes of observation he rode back and returned with General Longstreet, and then established a point for the returning men to fall back on. The color guard. The account given of Lieutenant William M. Lawson, who was the color bearer of the regiment is as follows: When the order was given to forward the color bearer and guard consisting of Color Bearer William M. Lawson, Sergeants Pat Woods, Theodore R. Martin, Corporal John Q. Figg, and Private Willie Mitchell moved four paces to the front of the line and kept in their position until one after the o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
untain, in Orange county. Here he was joined by General Lee with Longstreet's Corps. After a few days' needed rest, the army broke camp on A could run, and before he reached General Starke cried out, it is Longstreet. A great shout that Longstreet had come was taken up by the men Longstreet had come was taken up by the men all down the line. The courier then told Gen. Starke that the man sitting on a stump, whom we had noticed before was General Lee, and that LLongstreet said he had got up in time to witness our charge, which he said was splendid. This put new life into Jackson's men, as they had heard nothing of Longstreet. They knew that Pope with his large army would put forth all the energy he could to greatly damage us, but everythe would not, after his repulse of the morning and the presence of Longstreet. He did attack A. P. Hill's division on the left of Jackson's lioon, and met with the same repulse as we had given him. A part of Longstreet's command became heavily engaged also. This ended the second day
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Captain John Holmes Smith's account. (search)
Va., and part of the 11th Virginia Infantry, Kemper's Brigade, Pickett's Division, 1st Corps (Longstreet), C. S. A., commanded that company, and then the regiment for a time in the battle of Gettysbion. Company E, on my right, lost more seriously than Company G, and was larger in number. Longstreet's presence. Just before the artillery fire ceased General Longstreet rode in a walk betweenGeneral Longstreet rode in a walk between the artillery and the infantry, in front of the regiment toward the left and disappeared down the line. He was as quiet as an old farmer riding over his plantation on a Sunday morning, and looked neong the tent of a friend, Captain Charles M. Blackford, judge advocate of our Second Corps, at Longstreet's headquarters, and this was the last of the battle of Gettysburg time. I didn't hear of Lieuong the line of guns in our immediate front, carrying a flag. Personal. I came away from Longstreet's headquarters after spending the night (after the battle in Captain Blackford's tent) in a wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
k to Gordonsville, unwilling to hazard an attack from Pope's superior force, which was rapidly advancing. General Lee in the meantime was hurrying forward with Longstreet and the two Hills, and joined Jackson at Raccoon ford, on the Rapidan river, August 20. The defeat of Banks raised in the minds of the Washington government bore the head lines, Headquarters in the Saddle. While Jackson marched to Pope's rear, General Lee diverted his attention by a pretended effort to cross with Longstreet's Corps. When Pope learned that Jackson was between him and Washington he advised General Halleck to withdraw every man from the peninsula and move them to t campaign and endeavoring to get his reins well in hand. Thus matters rested until about the 13th of November, 1862. The Army of Northern Virginia (except Longstreet's corps, at Culpeper), camped on the west side of the Blue Ridge, along the beautiful Valley, while on the east, or opposite side, camped the Army of the Potoma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
n's Brigade, were suffered to remain idle during the entire day. Lieutenant-General Longstreet, of the Army of Northern Virginia, reached General Bragg about 11 ohe command of the right was assigned to General Polk, and that of the left to Longstreet. Polk's command embraced Hill's Corps, Walker's Reserve Corps and Cheatham's Division of his own corps, while Forrest supported his right flank. Longstreet's wing was composed of Buckner's Corps, Hindman's Division of Polk's Corps, Johnson's Division, and Hood's and McLaws' Divisions of Longstreet's Corps. Notwithstanding the arrangements as told to General Longstreet, several officers of high ranGeneral Longstreet, several officers of high rank had no information on the subject. D. H. Hill had been selected to begin the combat, but received no advice to that effect until told by General Bragg, in person, ighest compliment to Manigault and his brigade, also to Deas and Anderson. Longstreet's wing of the army was now fully engaged, and was handled with skill and judg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
d Yorktown, began to retreat up the peninsula to Richmond. The Federals overtook us at Williamsburg, and there an important engagement was fought between Hooker's Division of Heintzleman's Corps and the Confederate rear guard, commanded by General Longstreet, on the 5th of May, 1862. Although our regiment was under heavy fire, it cannot be said to have been actually engaged in the battle of Williamsburg. After this important engagement, resulting in a great victory for the Confederate arms, w and who dated his orders from his Headquarters in the Saddle, had advanced across the Rappahannock as far south as Culpeper Courthouse, and near Gordonsville. Having reached the Rapidan, General Stonewall Jackson's Corps was sent to meet him. Longstreet followed Jackson, and by forced marches our brigade passed through Hopewell Gap, and arrived in time to participate in the second battle of Manassas, on the 29th of August, 1862. In my mind's eye I can see the dauntless Featherstone, mounted o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
e flag, came. When the men arrived, the one who carried the flag drew up before me, and, saluting with a rather stiff air—it was a strained occasion —informed me that he had been sent to beg a cessation of hostilities until General Lee could be heard from. Lee was even then said to be making a wide detour in the hope of attacking our forces from the rear. The officer who bore the flag was a member of the Confederate General Gordon's staff, but the message came to me in the name of General Longstreet. At that time the command had devolved upon General Ord, and I informed the officer with the flag—which was, by the way, a towel of such cleanliness that I was then, as now, amazed that such a one could be found in the entire Rebel army—that he must needs proceed along to our left, where General Ord was stationed. With another abjectedly stiff salute the officer with his milk-white banner galloped away down our line. It was subsequently learned that General Ord was situated so