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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 180 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 148 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 148 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 114 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 112 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 107 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 104 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 96 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 94 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 92 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. Longstreet or search for J. Longstreet in all documents.

Your search returned 74 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg. (search)
the field of Gettysburg I was placed by General Longstreet in command of all of his artillery on th discussed I do not know, but I do know that Longstreet was very averse to the assault by Pickett's My command, with the greater portion of Longstreet's corps, was in camp at Chambersburg from Saand I reported in person to Generals Lee and Longstreet, who were together on a hill in rear of our must charge. After the second note from General Longstreet, therefore, and the interview with Picke forward to the attack about 6 P. M. General Longstreet in his report refers to his orders on thle; but one of its brigades became engaged. Longstreet's attack, as all must admit was made too latthe return of absentees and the divisions of Longstreet, been increased to sixty-five thousand men, of Hill's and Ewell's corps had come up, and Longstreet's was only a few miles in rear. Having f any other act of the Gettysburg drama. General Longstreet did not enter into the spirit of it, and[29 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
by a simultaneous advance by his corps. General Longstreet was unexpectedly detained, however, as won — about noon on the second. In this, General Longstreet clearly admits that he assumed the respoal plan was adhered to. The two divisions of Longstreet's corps gallantly advanced, forced the enemyarge force of the enemy near Gettysburg, General Longstreet was urged to hasten his march, and this,y rate, it would be unreasonable to hold General Longstreet alone accountable for this. Indeed, grehe attack. The general plan was unchanged. Longstreet, reinforced by Pickett's three brigades, whiEwell, who had orders to co-operate with General Longstreet, and who was, of course, not aware of and understood the arrangements to be that General Longstreet should endeavor to force the enemy's lineneral Lane, in his report, says: General Longstreet ordered me to form in rear of the right stituted all of the Confederate line held by Longstreet's troops, and it is not apparent how they we[15 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
inued from our September no.] The papers which we have been publishing on the battle of Gettysburg have attracted great attention and excited wide interest. We hope to add a number of others from distinguised soldiers who were in position to know what occurred, and who have promised to send us their views on the questions propounded by our distinguished foreign critic. In response to our request for a paper from General John B. Hood he sends us a copy of the following letter to General Longstreet. In a note to the Secretary accompanying this letter General Hood says: It does not cover all the points upon which you desire information, but may prove of interest. We feel sure that our readers will be glad to have the statement of this gallant and accomplished soldier. Letter from General John B. Hood. New Orleans, La., June 28th, 1875. Gen. James Longstreet: General: I have not responded earlier to your letter of April 5th, by reason of pressure of business, which ren
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel E. P. Alexander's report of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
nd: On arriving on the field on the 2d of July, about 10 A. M., I was ordered by Lieutenant-General Longstreet to accompany the movements to the right, then being commenced by Hood's and McLaw's ns, and the Washington Artillery, of fourteen guns, arrived and reported to me by order of General Longstreet, by whom I was directed to prepare for a general attack upon the enemy to our front and leint of woods on the left, where we joined with the Third corps. At 11 A. M. I reported to General Longstreet that the artillery was ready to open fire, and was directed by him to take a position whene flank of my line of guns for the signal to open fire, I received the following note from General Longstreet: Headquarters, July 3d, 1863. Colonel: If the artillery fire does not have the effectand I also dispatched verbal messages to the same effect. At fifteen minutes to 2 o'clock General Longstreet came up to my position, and on learning the state of affairs, ordered me to stop Pickett's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
and Jones, which had been left guarding the passes of the Blue Ridge when the last of our infantry and artillery, under Longstreet and Hill, crossed the Potomac, whilst I exclude them from mine. Those brigades had remained south of the Potomac on thsion. The official reports show the losses in the infantry and artillery of the several corps above, as follows: In Longstreet's corps7,659 Ewell's6,094 Hill's8,982 Total22,735 This is exclusive of the loss in the cavalry, which was not iimate of our losses in the whole campaign is not far from correct. To illustrate this view: The official reports of Longstreet, Jackson, and D. H. Hill; in whose commands were comprised the whole of our infantry and artillery engaged in the campans for September, made after Sharpsburg and the minor engagements following it, show for duty 52,609, while the loss in Longstreet's, Jackson's, and D. H. Hill's commands, including missing, for the period above stated, was 23,575. This again exclud