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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 180 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 148 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 148 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 114 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 112 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 107 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 104 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 96 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 94 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 92 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. Longstreet or search for J. Longstreet in all documents.

Your search returned 54 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
E. P. Alexander, late Chief of Artillery of Longstreet's Corps. [The following interesting and v1866 as an appendix to a proposed history of Longstreet's corps by its able and accomplished Chief oe force out of the critical action fought by Longstreet and A. P. Hill late in the afternoon at Frazd about two miles from Frazier's Farm, where Longstreet and Hill were already engaged, by a powerfultillery, averaging eighteen guns each. In Longstreet's corps one battalion carried twenty-six guns returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent attle of Chickamauga. Report of Lieutenant-General Longstreet. headquarters near Chattano Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General. Diary of Rev. J. Mr. Dickerson, viewing the ground over which Longstreet's brave men made their fruitless charge, andnewall, who, on this occasion, turned to General Longstreet and said: General, your artillery is muc[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
ith Johnston, moved two brigades, just arrived from Mississippi, and three of Longstreet's corps, all without artillery and transportation. The following orders weot affected until late in the afternoon. At this time Major-General Hood, of Longstreet's corps, arrived and assumed command of the column, Brigadier-General Johnstof the action early the next morning. Information was received from Lieutenant-General Longstreet of his arrival at Ringgold and departure for the field. Five smallps were stationed, the latter continuing his command of the right. Lieutenant-General Longstreet reached my headquarters about 11 P. M., and immediately received hieceived from Lieutenant-Generals Polk and Hill, and only two from brigades in Longstreet's corps. The absence of these has caused a delay in making up my own, and inTennessee. The holding of this all-important route was confided to Lieutenant-General Longstreet's command, and its possssion forced the enemy to a road double the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
Confederate Artillery service. By Gen. E. P. Alexander, late Chief of Artillery of Longstreet's Corps. [The following interesting and valuable paper was written in 1866 as an appendix to a proposed history of Longstreet's corps by its able and accomplished Chief of Artillery.] As the Confederate artillery labored throughout the war under disadvantages which have scarcely been known outsidehen the enemy withdrew, having kept Jackson's whole force out of the critical action fought by Longstreet and A. P. Hill late in the afternoon at Frazier's Farm. The superior ammunition and guns of tile pressing down the Charles City road was checked about two miles from Frazier's Farm, where Longstreet and Hill were already engaged, by a powerful battery of rifled guns posted on high open groundf infantry each) had with it five battalions of artillery, averaging eighteen guns each. In Longstreet's corps one battalion carried twenty-six guns, three carried eighteen each, and one carried bu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
t it to General Hardee's headquarters in Mississippi, who referred it to General Johnston. General Johnston's Adjutant, thinking the section had accompanied General Walker's division to Chickamauga, sent the application to General Walker for further action. But this not being the case, General Walker endorsed on the paper that the section was not with his division, having been left at Morton, Miss., and sent to General Bragg. The application was returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's headquarters at Meridian, Miss. The General's Adjutant referred him to General Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with the section; but at the same time instructed Colonel Wickliffe, by telegraph, not to let the section leave Demopolis, as a battery had already been taken from his department, and he did not intend any other should leave. This information was received f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
out the aid of infantry. As it was some single shots were made which were even terrible to look at. Gaps were cut in their ranks visible at the distance of a mile, and a long cut of the unfinished Orange railroad was several times raked through by the thirty-pound Parrot, which enfiladed it from Lee's Hill, while filled with troops. * * * General A., in his notes, says, This gun exploded during the afternoon at the thirty-ninth discharge, but fortunately did no harm, though Generals Lee, Longstreet, and others were standing very near it. Now, what I desire to state is, this gun was one of a section of the Macon Light Artillery, of Macon, Georgia, referred to in General A's first paper, wherein he says, Among the guns in position on Lee's hill were two thirty-pound Parrotts, under Lieutenant Anderson, which had just been sent from Richmond, and which did beautiful practice until they burst, one at the thirty-ninth round, and the other at the fifty-fourth. In connection with this
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
Battle of Chickamauga. Report of Lieutenant-General Longstreet. headquarters near Chattanooga, October, 1862. Colonel George Wm. Brent, Assistant Adjutant-General: Colonel,—Our train reached Catoosa platform, near Ringgold, about 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th of September. As soon as our horses came up, about 4 o'clock, I started with Colonel Sorrel and Colonel Manning, of my staff, to find the headquarters of the Commanding General. We missed our way, and did not repoist of casualties shows a lost by the command (without McNair's brigade, from which no report has been received) of one thousand and eighty-nine killed, six thousand five hundred and six wounded, and two hundred and seventy-two missing. Its strength, on going into action on the 20th, was two thousand and thirty-three officers, and twenty thousand eight hundred and forty-nine men. I have the honor to be, Colonel, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ilways, through the charming regions of Piedmont Virginia, the Valley of Virginia, Southwest Virginia, and East Tennessee, we reached Knoxville at 3:30 A. M., but even at that hour found Colonel Moses White and Professor W. G. McAdoo at the depot to give us a cordial welcome and comfortable quarters. The day was most pleasantly spent receiving calls from prominent citizens, driving around the city, inspecting the beautiful model farm of Mr. Dickerson, viewing the ground over which Longstreet's brave men made their fruitless charge, and visiting other points of interest in this busy, thriving city. At night an audience, variously estimated at from six to eight hundred of Knoxville's best people, assembled to hear General Lee's address on Chancellorsville, and gave him hearty and appreciative applause. We bore away cherished recollections of Knoxville, and had a very pleasant trip by Rome, Ga., and Calera, to Montgomery Ala., where our old comrade, the gallant and ac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
ge of base, the battalion marched with General Lee's army, and at Rappahannock Station engaged the batteries of General Pope, and then moved forward through Thoroughfare Gap. Manassas's great battle, of two days duration, followed, resulting in the defeat and flight of Pope's army, notwithstanding his vain glorious proclamation from headquarters in the saddle. The greatest compliment the Washington Artillery ever received was from the great Stonewall, who, on this occasion, turned to General Longstreet and said: General, your artillery is much superior to mine. On to Maryland! was then the cry, and the heads of columns were directed to the Potomac, and the river was forded with the high hope of winning peace upon the soil of that State, but, alas, at Sharpsburg, from early morn till dewy eve, we fought till To the right, to the left and around, and around, Death whirled in its dance on the bloody ground, 'Till God's sunlight was quenched in fiery fight, And over the hosts fe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
dvance, and again Sheridan fell back, this time to Halltown. At last he had reached a position he deemed himself strong enough to hold against Early's 21,000 men. Early finding it impossible to get at the Federal army in its last position, moved on the 25th towards the Potomac, and ran against and severely defeated Sheridan's cavalry. Once more it seemed as if the North was to be invaded. Sheridan telegraphed that Early had marched with the intention of crossing the Potomac; that two of Longstreet's divisions were with him; that his own army might have to cross to the north side; that he hardly thought they would attempt to go to Washington. He hurried troops to hold the South Mountain gaps, near Boonsboro. But Early did not cross; he had already gone to the utmost verge of prudence in the presence of a foe, whose strength was between two and three times as great as his own, and he therefore fell back next day to Bunker Hill and Stephenson's. Mr. Pond attempts a defence of thes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
dson's (Letcher Artillery); Latham's (Branch Artillery); McIntosh's (Pee Dee Artillery); Pegram's (Purcell Artillery); Fleet's (Middlesex Artillery)—(7). Attached to Ewell's Division, (Major A. R. Courtenay, Chief of Artillery); Lattimer's (Courtenay Artillery); J. R. Johnson's (Bedford Artillery); D'Aquin's (Louisiana Guard Artillery); Dement's (First Maryland Artillery); Brown's (Second Maryland Artillery); Balthis's (Staunton Artillery); Pleasants's (Manchester Artillery)—(7). On Longstreet's wing. Attached to Hood's Division, (Major B. W. Frobel, Chief of Artillery).—Bachman's South Carolina Battery; Garden's South Carolina Battery; Reilly's North Carolina Battery—(3). Attached to Wilcox's Division.—Anderson's (Thomas Artillery), with Wilcox's Brigade; Maurin's (Donaldsonville Artillery), with Pryor's Brigade; Chapman's (Dixie Artillery), with Featherston's Brigade—(3). Attached to G. T. Anderson's Brigade, (D. R. Jones's Division). Brown's (Wise Ar
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