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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 773 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 581 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 468 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 457 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 450 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 400 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 388 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 344 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 319 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 312 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for James Longstreet or search for James Longstreet in all documents.

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which Bragg fell back to Lafayette, Ga. Bragg had just received help from Mississippi, and Longstreet, with Hood and Kershaw, was speeding from Virginia. Rosecrans made a faulty movement by dividf Thunder, will stand for all time two dates—September 19th and 20th—days of heroic fighting. Longstreet had arrived and was in command of Bragg's left. Polk commanded his right. Bragg was delayedning, was found behind his log intrenchments when the night came. On September 20th, Polk and Longstreet forced the fighting. As at Stone's River, everything seemed lost to the Federals. A great rorse had the same honor with General Polk. Capt. George V. Moody's Madison battery, coming with Longstreet, arrived too late for the battle. Later reports show the First Louisiana regulars, Col. Jamcavalry, Maj. J. M. Taylor, attached to Bragg's headquarters. The Madison battery went with Longstreet into East Tennessee, where Colonel Alexander reported: One of my most gallant officers, Capt.
orders to retire to the rear as soon as the ford itself should be commanded by the foe. The northern bank, in front of Longstreet, rose with a steep slope at least 50 feet above the water level. A hazardous difference! This ridge, rising from a naal parapet. Behind this parapet the enemy approached under shelter, in strength, within less than one hundred yards of Longstreet's skirmishers. The southern bank was fairly level, forming almost a plain. This plain gradually rose at a distance frhe course of the combat Captain Eshleman, five privates, and the horse of Lieutenant Richardson ... By direction of General Longstreet, his battery (two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton's battery) was then advanced by hand, out of the range now ascertaarles Griffin's six guns. Of the two artillerists, both to be generals, Rosser seems to have had the advantage in aim. Longstreet reported that it was difficult to say whether the work of the infantry or the destructive fire of the Washington artill
with J. R. Anderson; and the Fourteenth regiment, First battalion (Coppens') and Maurin's battery, in Pryor's brigade. The Washington artillery was attached to Longstreet's division, and the Madison (Moody's) battery to D. R. Jones' division. Pryor, marching to the front via Mechanicsville, with Longstreet, was posted at BeaveLongstreet, was posted at Beaver Dam, where he was in battle on the 27th of June. In the affair at Ellison's mill, said Pryor, the battalion of Lieutenant-Colonel Coppens was especially distinguished. At Gaines' Mill these Louisianians bore a gallant part in the intrepid charges which cost so many lives, and at Frayser's Farm they held their ground with heroit Malvern Hill. The other Louisiana commands were with that part of the army that opposed the main body of McClellan's forces before Richmond, while Jackson, Longstreet, and the Hills crushed the Federal right wing beyond the Chickahominy. The first fight of the whole great campaign was at King's schoolhouse, June 25th, the en
opened. Colonel Walton was appointed by General Longstreet as chief of artillery of the right wing dingly elastic phrase. Under a fighter like Longstreet, it might mean many chances on the fighting elf late on the afternoon of Malvern Hill. Longstreet had said: We have done all we can to-day. Plarger army which was following with Lee and Longstreet. Meanwhile Longstreet was marching to ThoLongstreet was marching to Thoroughfare gap, with him Colonel Walton in command of artillery, including the Washington artillery, and other batteries. Lee not in sight and Longstreet still outside the gap, Pope's chance for a band Lee near by. Pope should have known that Longstreet had passed through—he did not. Believing fatthe 28th on, he could have barred the gap to Longstreet. On the 29th the attempt to regain the townre held together. About noon on the 29th, Longstreet sent Miller and Squires to open on the enemyto the enemy's lines of infantry, meant that Longstreet, long looked for, was near, and that a stron[6 more...]
t at such a range. Next morning, the 16th, the enemy brought some batteries closer, and at 11 a m. an artillery duel began, lasting for forty minutes, when General Longstreet sent word to save the ammunition. Captain Squires' rifles were the only ones of the battalion engaged. Down in front and to the right of the battalion at leaders of brave men in this defense of the Confederate center. Captain Miller, with his four Napoleons, ordered to the left, was assigned to position by General Longstreet. It was a post of honor and danger, and soon, Lieutenant Hero having been wounded and Lieutenant McElroy having been detached to the right, Miller found hi for several hours; to Lieutenants Hero and McElroy, Sergeant Ellis and Artificers Bier and Dempsey. This part of the action was under the immediate eye of General Longstreet and his staff, who, when Captain Miller's cannoneers were exhausted, dismounted and assisted the working of the guns. Captain Richardson, played upon by
commanded by Lieut. Prosper Landry, the other by Lieut. Camille Mollere. For a time, on the first day, Maurin had a gun which was ordered by Major Latrobe, of Longstreet's staff, to be placed outside the works, where it could not bear upon the enemy assaulting Marye's. Where they were, the gun's defenders, commanded by Landry, wncellorsville. Here Fighting Joe, forgetting his nickname won by daring, rested, undecided, one full wasted day. When at last prepared to advance, Lee (without Longstreet, who was absent at Suffolk), hastening by forced marches from Fredericksburg, was ready to meet him. After barely feeling Lee, Hooker tempted him by retiring in.-Col. R. E. Burke, Tenth by Maj. T. N. Powell, Fourteenth by Lieut.-Col. David Zable, Fifteenth by Maj. Andrew Brady. Col. J. M. Walton, still in command of Longstreet's artillery, had in his reserve the battalion of E. P. Alexander and the Washington artillery battalion under Maj. B. F. Eshleman, whose Fourth company was now
alley and believed it meant mischief to the North. When he found Longstreet following Ewell he also started for the Potomac. An army betweenredericksburg, and A. P. Hill crossing the mountains marched with Longstreet into Maryland and on to Chambersburg. Hooker's army was in Marmond might have fallen. The capture of Harrisburg was abandoned; Longstreet and Hill were ordered eastward through the passes of South mountathe first day he showed his sound common sense in what he said to Longstreet: They are there in position. I am going to whip them, or they arthe strong position occupied during the next two days by Hill and Longstreet. Hays' brigade, said Early, advanced toward the town on Gordon'sry hill. It had been arranged that when the column was ready General Longstreet should order two guns fired by Captain Eshleman. At 1:30 a message came to Walton from Longstreet: Let the batteries open. In a moment, says Col. William Miller Owen of the Washington artillery, the re
ean's house was flashed through the armies, not yet quite through with fighting here and there. Gordon and Sheridan had passed the forenoon in filling the air of Appomattox with noise of battle. On April 9th the artillery battalion went up to Longstreet on the hill for orders. Turn into that field on your right and park your guns, said Longstreet. The battery so long in their hands, so often an instrument of power and defiance, was parked in that field on the right, there to be forever separLongstreet. The battery so long in their hands, so often an instrument of power and defiance, was parked in that field on the right, there to be forever separated from its gunners, to whom each gun was dear as friend and noisy comrade. The Louisiana brigade was at Appomattox—all there was of it! Lieut.-Col. W. M. Owen had been ordered with his guns to report at the Brown house, where General Gordon was. Gordon said: Major, you are from Louisiana; I will send you the Louisiana brigade to support your guns. Naturally the fittest support of a Louisiana battery would be Louisiana infantry. Now, through the pines the Louisiana brigade comes marchin
gadier-General Zebulon York Brigadier-General Zebulon York accompanied the Fourteenth Louisiana to Virginia in 861 as its lieutenant-colonel. In the early spring of 1862 the Fourteenth Louisiana was on the peninsula in the division of Gen. James Longstreet. On the 5th of May, as the army of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston retired toward Richmond his rear guard had a very sharp conflict with McClellan's advance at Williamsburg, with the result both sides claimed a victory. General Longstreet in hiGeneral Longstreet in his report thus speaks: Lieut.-Col. Zebulon York discharged his difficult duties with marked skill and fearlessness. During the Seven Days he had become colonel of the Fourteenth Louisiana and led the regiment through that fiery ordeal. After the campaigns of Second Manassas, Maryland and Fredericksburg Colonel York was ordered to report to Gen. Richard Taylor in Louisiana to organize and drill conscripts designed for the Louisiana brigades in the army of Northern Virginia. After he had complet