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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 773 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 581 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 468 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 457 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 450 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 400 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 388 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 344 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 319 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 312 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James Longstreet or search for James Longstreet in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
Soon after reaching the Wilderness, on the 6th of May, 1864, we moved to the right and south of the plank road, the sharpshooters being deployed as skirmishers about 150 yards in advance of the brigade. General Mahone then informed me that General Longstreet had sent two brigades to attack the flank of the enemy, while his own brigade would attack in front, and that as soon as cheering was heard on the flank, to move the sharpshooters forward slowly, and co-operate with this movement. Soon the our hands, among the latter General Wadsworth. I was left in charge of the sharpshooters who remained in front of the line during the night. The woods were on fire, and the cries of the wounded made the night hideous. The wounding of General Longstreet placed General Mahone in command of the division, Colonel D. A. Weisiger, of the Twelfth Regiment, in command of the brigade, and necessitated my return to command the Twelfth Regiment, of which I was Lieutenant-Colonel. I must say that it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
it was but an affair of the rear guard with Longstreet only, for that Hill had but one regiment eng as our trains had not yet gotten well away, Longstreet, the rear guard of to-day, was told to checked up the expected courier. Move quickly to Longstreet's support, said he. The prudent forethous to the York, the right and centre of which Longstreet occupied, but through an oversight or careleing a fortified position in our own line, in Longstreet's flank and rear, with nothing between him and Williamsburg, or between him and Longstreet's road of retreat. Had these timid division commandethey might at once have occupied the road in Longstreet's rear, and cut him off completely. But thory of that day, which till then was all with Longstreet's Brigades, asked and obtained leave from Gey to do so. The message was delivered to General Longstreet, who referred the messenger to me, we be by them. Colonel—now General—Bratton, on Longstreet's left, who witnessed the charge, says, many[6 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
A brilliant coup. How Wade Hampton captured Grant's entire beef supply. Colonel Cardwell's thrilling story. [from the Charleston, S. C., News and Courier, Oct. 10, 1894.] The greatest cattle raid of the War—2,486 beeves driven from Coggin's Point into the Confederate lines. After that fateful day, May 11, 1864, when the bullet of the enemy took from the cavalry corps its great commander, J. E. B. Stuart, at Yellow Tavern, that man who Longstreet said was the greatest cavalryman America ever saw; that man upon whom Jackson threw his mantle, like Elijah of old; that man upon whom General Lee depended for eyes and ears—General Lee did not have to look for his successor; no, he was close at hand, and had carved his name with his sabre high in the list of the world's great soldiers. It was Wade Hampton upon whom the mantle fell, and who was worthier? We have heard and do know of the achievements of this command and that command, from the pens of officers and privates, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
F. Medical-Director Headquarters Army T., Nov. 16, ‘63, ordered to report General Longstreet. Bell, W. F., Assistant Surgeon. Appointed by Secretary of War, Nov. t, Sept. 6, ‘63, ordered to report to Surgeon Stout, ordered to report to General Longstreet Jan. 31, Feb. 29, ‘64, 41st Georgia. Bryan, James Hamilton, Assistant on. Sept. 30, ‘63, left with wounded at Gettysburg. Assigned to duty by General Longstreet in East Tennessee, March 31, ‘64. April 30, ‘64, 2d Georgia Cavalry. ned to Hindman's Division Dec. 18, ‘63. Dec. 16, ‘63, ordered to report to Gen. Longstreet for duty. Nidelet, S. R., Surgeon. Dec. 16, ‘63, ordered to report to 2, ‘63, ordered to report to E. A. F. Oct. 21, ‘63, ordered to report to General Longstreet for duty with Walker's Division. Oct. 31, ‘63; 30th Georgia. Feb. 29, ‘6or assignment, to date from Sept. ‘62. Nov. 21, ‘63, ordered to report to General Longstreet. Dec. 4, ‘63, ordered to report to General Breck
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A National Repository for the Records and Relics of the Southern cause, proposed by Charles Broadway Rouss, of New York. (search)
Davis) as the organization to which the patriotic trust might worthily be committed. Mr. Rouss proposed that each Veteran Camp should subscribe at least $10, and inspired the hope that he would insure the final success of his scheme. The location of the Museum, Mr. Rouss suggested, should be left to the decision of the ten senior generals of the Confederate army, now living. These are stated by General Marcus J. Wright, of the National War Record Office, to be as follows: 1. James Longstreet, lieutenant-general October 9, 1862. 2. Stephen D. Lee, lieutenant-general (temporary rank) January 23, 1864. 3. Ambrose P. Stewart, lieutenant-general January 23, 1864. 4. S. B. Buckner, lieutenant-general September 20, 1864. 5. Wade Hampton, lieutenant-general February 14, 1865. 6. Gustavus W. Smith, major-general September 19, 1861. 7. La Fayette McLaws, major-general May 23, 1862. 8. S. G. French, major-general August 31, 1862. 9. J. H. Forney, major-general