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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Marvin Lord or search for Marvin Lord in all documents.

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Assistant-Surgeon Stephen Griswold and Quartermaster Charles J. Murphy, both taken prisoners. Company A.--Wounded--Charles H. L. Roediger, slightly in the hand. Missing--Jacob Schindler and John McNamara. Company B.--Killed--Sergeant Samuel Ashworth. Privates William Weir, Louis Leonard, Charles Paulson, Louis Williams, James H. Hart, and George Robinson. Wounded--Capt. Eugene McGrath, slightly. Privates Michael McGrane, in the head, (missing;) Walter S. Kniffin, in the knee; Marvin Lord, in the thigh; H. B. Hendrickson, in the arm. Company C.--Wounded--Captain Robert F. Allason, slightly. Privates A. Klaila and J. Maier, severely; A. Scharf and J. Schimelpfenning, mortally. Missing--R. Gabitch, J. Hoefer, J. Hirt, A. Keller, S. Shaublein, A. Ahr, supposed to be prisoners. Company D.--Killed-Privates Philo E. Lewis, William Chambers, Martin Donahoe. Wounded--Lieut. John Brady, Jr., badly in the wrist; Frank Paine, bayonet in leg; William Mackey, wounded in fo
e. Meantime what ought to have been the crowning manoeuvre of the engagement was going on. Capt. Benham had observed a point some distance up the river, where he thought the bluff on the right could be scaled, and a flank movement thus be made to turn the enemy's left. Old Dumont was instantly ordered to ford the river and lead the Seventh Indiana up the bluff. The ascent was terrible, and the thicket of laurel added fresh difficulties. But the Colonel had already reached the summit; Capt. Lord's company and another had followed him, and the rest were ready to ascend, when some one bore the word to Capt. Benham, who was on another part of the field, the statement that the ascent was impracticable. In five minutes more the enemy's flank could have been turned and the engagement ended, but Benham, acting on the information he had received, ordered Colonel Dumont then to proceed down the river and turn the other flank. When the order was delivered the Colonel was mystified. The