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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 92 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 9 (search)
al misconduct, and as we do not pretend that Mr. Loring, sitting as a Judge of Probate, has been guight and trifling reasons for the removal of Judge Loring, but such grave and serious reasons, such w a slave warrant; and it may be claimed that Mr. Loring did not transgress it, since he issued his wsince this was not in existence in 1843, and Mr. Loring's action in the Burns case was under the actit is so precisely like the act of 1793; and Mr. Loring, in his Burns judgment, takes the same view.l circumstances. What shall we say now to Mr. Loring's claim, that neither when he received the c prevent everybody else from catching slaves. Loring actually hunted a slave, and sent him to Virgiy method of the trial of Anthony Burns shows Mr. Loring unfit to be continued longer on the bench. mmissioner is unfit to sit upon the bench. Mr. Loring cannot see it, although it was written and s, as well as that remarkable Decision which Judge Loring might have given, originally published in t[36 more...]
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
my memory we have got a man for Governor of Massachusetts, a frank, true, whole-souled, honest man. [Cheering.] That gain alone is worth all the labor. But the office is not the most important in the Commonwealth; only now and then it becomes commanding; in a sad Burns week, for instance, when Mr. Washburn was masquerading as Governor, and when, as Emerson said, if we had a man, and not a cockade, in the chair, something might be done ; or, later, when the present Chief Magistrate pushed Judge Loring, on false pretences, from his stool. Such occasions remind us we have a Governor. But in common times, the Chief Justiceship is far more commanding,--is the real Gibraltar of our State contests. John A. Andrew should have been Chief Justice. [Applause.] You remember they made the first William Pitt Earl of Chatham, and he went into eclipse in the House of Lords. Some one asked Chesterfield what had become of Pitt. He has had a fall up-stairs, was the answer. Governor Andrew or Judg
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 14: the Nebraska Bill.—1854. (search)
e and the Mayor J. V. C. Smith. of Boston concentrated all the military within reach to prevent a second attempt and enforce the decision of the court; how Commissioner Loring yielded up the victim Edward Greely Loring. to his master; and how, amid every emblem and manifestation of popular indignation and mourning, Burns Lib. 24Edward Greely Loring. to his master; and how, amid every emblem and manifestation of popular indignation and mourning, Burns Lib. 24.90, 91; 25.34, 38, 42, 59. was carried down State Street between armed files to the place of embarkation. To point the contrast that nullification of the Compromise of 1850 meant treason, while nullification of the Missouri Compromise by Congress at Washington meant simply a return to the Constitution, Judge Benjamin R. Curtis c And let all the people say, Amen ; and a unanimous cheer and shout of Amen burst from the vast audience. In like manner Mr. Garrison burned the decision of Edward G. Loring in the case of Anthony Burns, and the Lib. 24.92. late charge of Judge Benjamin R. Curtis to the United States Lib. 24.101. Grand Jury in reference to the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
furnish the most signal examples of resistance to that Power, and to take, logically and in the eyes of the South, a disunion attitude. The first was the address of its Legislature to the Lib. 25.75. Governor, praying for the removal of Edward Greely Loring from his office of Judge of Probate for having, as United States Commissioner, sent Anthony Burns back into bondage. This action was in response to petitions Lib. 25.23. actively circulated by the abolitionists, and to arguments Lib. 25orfeit his right to practise in the courts; for a judge to do either was to make himself liable to impeachment or removal by address. No United States Commissioner under the Fugitive Slave Law should hold any State office. Any State judge (like Loring), continuing to be United States Commissioner after the passage of the act, would invite the consequences of misbehavior. No sheriff, jailer, or policeman could help arrest a fugitive, no jail receive him. The militia could not be called out on