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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 131 3 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 95 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 43 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 12 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate invasion of New Mexico and Arizona. (search)
and he arrived at Fort Bliss on the 14th of December, and assumed command of all the forces of the Confederate States on the Rio Grande at and above Fort Quitman, and all in the territory of New Mexico and Arizona, and his command was designated as the Army of New Mexico. By General Orders, No. 97, November 9th, 1861, the United States Department of New Mexico was reestablished and placed under the command of Colonel E. R. S. Canby, 19th U. S. Infantry, who had previously relieved Colonel W. W. Loring, commanding the regiment of Mounted Rifles, who had tendered his resignation to the President, and had left his station before its acceptance. After Lynde's surrender, New Mexico, south of the Jornado del Muerto, was in possession of the rebels, and Canby set about enlisting and reorganizing the militia of the Territory. He also caused Fort Craig to be strengthened by throwing up earth-works, while Fort Union, in the north-eastern part of the Territory, was changed from its old loca
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
epartment ordered his old Stonewall brigade and six thousand troops under command of Brigadier-General W. W. Loring to report to him. These, together with Turner Ashby's cavalry, gave him a force of aad won by his previous services saved him from personal ruin. He and his second in command, General Loring, had a serious disagreement. He ordered Loring to take up his quarters, in January, in the Loring to take up his quarters, in January, in the exposed and cheerless village of Romney, on the south branch of the upper Potomac. Loring objected to this, but Jackson was inexorable. Loring and his principal officers united in a petition to Mr. Loring objected to this, but Jackson was inexorable. Loring and his principal officers united in a petition to Mr. Benjamin, Secretary of War, to order them to Winchester, or at least away from Romney. This document was sent direct to the War Office, and the Secretary, in utter disregard of good order and disciplLoring and his principal officers united in a petition to Mr. Benjamin, Secretary of War, to order them to Winchester, or at least away from Romney. This document was sent direct to the War Office, and the Secretary, in utter disregard of good order and discipline, granted the request without consulting Jackson. As soon as information reached Jackson of what had been done, he indignantly resigned his commission. Governor Letcher was astounded, and at once
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
ry to know how Jackson managed to slip off so often and so easily. His plan was to press his infantry as near as possible to the enemy, without bringing on a general engagement; then to occupy these advanced points with dismounted cavalry pickets, and to start his foot cavalry in the other direction with all possible speed. His stealthy marches to the rear were made without consulting his highest officers, and even without their knowing his destination. This was a source of annoyance to Loring in ‘61, and later on to Ewell. When Jackson's corps was so strangely left at Winchester after the battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam, and General Lee had gone to the Rappahannock (we were making a feint every day of holding the gaps in the Blue Ridge, with strict orders not to bring on an engagement), I said to Jackson one day: I am the next in rank, and should you be killed or captured in your many scouts around, I would not know what the corps was left for, or what it was expected to do.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
s destined for the operations against Vicksburg were ordered by General Grant to Milliken's Bend and Young's Point, where he joined them on the 29th. These troops were employed until April in cutting a canal through the point of land opposite Vicksburg, to enable the Federal vessels to pass it without exposure to the batteries; but the attempt was unsuccessful. In the meantime Brigadier-General Bowen was detached with three brigades to Grand Gulf, to construct batteries there; and Major-General Loring, with a similar detachment, was sent to select and fortify a position to prevent the enemy from approaching Vicksburg by the Yazoo Pass and River. He constructed a field-work for this object at the head of the Yazoo. A flotilla of 9 United States gun-boats and 20 transports, carrying 4500 troops, appeared before it on the 11th of March, Major-General Martin L. Smith, C. S. A. From a photograph. and constructed a land-battery, which, with the gun-boats, cannonaded the fort several
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
e Tallahatchie and Yallabusha rivers, near their junction [February 24th to April 8th]. Here General Loring, with 3 guns and about 1500 men, turned back a large fleet and land force, and won the sobrithe south and east. The army here assembled consisted of three divisions: Bowen's on the right, Loring's in the center, and C. L. Stevenson's on the left, numbering about 18,000 men. Some slight fielgh the Federal army, and finding itself unsupported turned around and bored its way back again. Loring's division did not cooperate with the other two, through some misunderstanding or misconception,. While in the discharge of this duty General Tilghman was killed. Our beaten forces, except Loring's division, retreated across Baker's Creek and took position at nightfall at Big Black bridge; pposition in the tete-de-pont on the east bank of the river, and part on the bluffs on the west. Loring's division was moved by its commander, by the right; flank, around the Federal army, and finally
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
ignity of a battle until daylight. The enemy had taken a strong natural position with most of the Grand Gulf garrison, numbering about seven or eight thousand men, under General Bowen. His hope was to hold me in check until reenforcements under Loring could reach him from Vicksburg; but Loring did not come in time to render much assistance south of Port Gibson. Two brigades of McPherson's corps followed McClernand as fast as rations and ammunition could be issued, and were ready to take positiLoring did not come in time to render much assistance south of Port Gibson. Two brigades of McPherson's corps followed McClernand as fast as rations and ammunition could be issued, and were ready to take position upon the battle-field whenever the Thirteenth Corps could be got out of the way. The country in this part of Mississippi stands on edge, as it were, the roads running along the ridges except when they occasionally pass from one ridge to another. Where there are no clearings, the sides of the hills are covered with a very heavy growth of timber, and with undergrowth, and the ravines are filled with vines and canebrakes, almost impenetrable. This makes it easy for an inferior force to dela
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Confederate forces: Lieut.-General John C. Pemberton. (search)
, Brig.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker: 1st Bat'n Ga. Sharp-shooters, Maj. A Shaaff; Ga. Bat'y, Capt. R. Martin. Unattached, 3d Ky. (mounted), Col. A. P. Thompson; 8th Ky. (mounted), Col. H. B. Lyon. After Grant's withdrawal from Jackson to Vicksburg the reinforcements received by Johnston consisted of the brigades of Rust and Maxey from Port Hudson; Ector's and McNair's brigades and the divisions of Breckinridge and W. H. Jackson from Tennessee; Evans's brigade from Charleston; and the division of Loring, from the force under Pemberton. [See p. 487.] On June 4th Johnston's effectives numbered, according to his own report, 24,000. [See also pp. 478, 479, 480.]--editors. Incomplete reports of Confederate losses from May 1st to July 3d, inclusive, aggregate 1260 killed, 3572 wounded, and 4227 captured or missing = 9059. Complete returns would doubtless swellthe numberto over 10,000. According to the parole lists on file in the War Departmnent the number surrendered on July 4th was 29,491
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
osed in this manoeuvre by Jackson's cavalry as well as 2500 men can resist 30,000. The angle where Hardee's right joined Loring's left was soon found to be a very weak point, and on the 17th another position was chosen, including the crest of Kenesaolonel Presstman prepared for occupation by the 19th, when it was assumed by the army. In this position two divisions of Loring's corps occupied the crest of Kenesaw from end to end, the other division being on its right, and Hood's corps on the right of it, Hardee's extending from Loring's left across the Lost Mountain and Marietta road. The enemy approached as usual, under cover of successive lines of intrenchments. In these positions of the two armies there were sharp and incessant partialtive [pp. 342, 343], where he admits his loss in killed and wounded as: Hood's corps (not reported); Hardee's corps, 286; Loring's (Polk's), 522,--total, 808. This, no doubt, is a true and fair statement; but, as usual, Johnston over-estimates our l
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
-of-battle strength. Cantey's division, For Cantey's strength, see General D. H. Maury's return April 22d, 1864. For Loring's strength, see General S. D. Lee's return May 10th, 1864. For French's detachment, see General French's report of effecrigades of infantry and two batteries, 5300 for duty, came from Mobile about the 7th of May and was stationed at Resaca. Loring's division, three infantry brigades and two batteries, from General S. I). Lee's command, with 5145 for duty and a detach for battle: Present for duty at DaltonApril 30th52,992 Mercer's brigadeMay 2d 2,800 Cantey's divisionMay 7th 5,300 Loring's divisionMay 10th, 11th, and 12th5,145 French's detachmentMay 12th 550 French's divisionMay 19th 4,174 Jackson's cava were held entirely at our mercy. The Fifteenth Corps lost 628 killed and wounded at Resaca. The troops in its front, Loring's and Cantey's divisions and Vaughan's brigade, according to their incomplete official reports, lost 698. Much the great
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
llaway; Ga. Battery (Ferrell's, one section), Lieut. W. B. S. Davis; Tenn. Battery, Capt. B. F. White, Lieut. A. Pue, Capt. B. F. White; Tenn. Battery, Lieut. D. B. Ramsey; Tenn. Battery, Capt. A. L. Huggins. Engineer troops, Lieut.-Col. S. W. Presstman. Polk's (or Stewart's) Corps, Army of Mississippi, Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring, Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham, Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart. Escort: Orleans Light Horse, Capt. L. Greenleaf. Loring's division, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. Escort: B, 7th Tenn. Cav., Capt. J. P. Russell. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston, Col. Robert Lowry, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 1st Miss., Maj. M. S. Alcorn; 3d Miss., Col. T. A. Melton, Lieut.-Col. S. M. Dyer; 22d Miss., Maj. Martin A. Oatis, Lieut.-Col. H. J. Reid, Capt. J. T. Formby; 31st Miss., Col. M. D. L. Stephens, Lieut.-Col. J. W. Drane, Lieut. William D. Shaw, Capt.
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