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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
t, at that time an unfinished work. When completed it was circular in form, having a parapet right, left and rear, with five embrasures. In the afternoon the battery began to reply to the enemy, who had moved up within reach. Toward sunset General Loring came up, and ordered Captain Rowan to fire as rapidly as possible, so as to attract the enemy's attention, and create a diversion of their forces from the left, upon which the Confederates were making a charge. This movement was a success. whose heart was shattered by the fragment of a shell, the troubled rank and file, whose faces showed the shame of defeat, betokened the result of the plans to save Vicksburg, inaugurated by the Commander-in-Chief. There was one man of sense—General Loring. He absolutely refused to go into Vicksburg, and declared to General Pemberton that he would not obey his orders, and he did, with about 10,000 men, cut his way out in spite of General Grant's cordon. That sturdy lion, General Johnston, per
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
th of July. This was much regretted by the line officers and the rank and file of the army. Siege of Atlanta. Next day the battery was ordered to Atlanta, and on the morning of the 22d was assigned to a position in the Peach Tree Street Redoubt, at that time an unfinished work. When completed it was circular in form, having a parapet right, left and rear, with five embrasures. In the afternoon the battery began to reply to the enemy, who had moved up within reach. Toward sunset General Loring came up, and ordered Captain Rowan to fire as rapidly as possible, so as to attract the enemy's attention, and create a diversion of their forces from the left, upon which the Confederates were making a charge. This movement was a success. Three thousand prisoners, twenty-eight pieces of artillery and a considerable quantity of ordnance stores were captured. The batteries kept up a continuous firing, night and day, for several days, to prevent the enemy from advancing their line. T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
sary officers great service; it would have done us more service in Vicksburg if it had been there. Vicksburg absorbed the troops from the Yazoo, as it did those from Big Black, Warrenton, and Champion Hills. The dead body of the brave Tilghman, whose heart was shattered by the fragment of a shell, the troubled rank and file, whose faces showed the shame of defeat, betokened the result of the plans to save Vicksburg, inaugurated by the Commander-in-Chief. There was one man of sense—General Loring. He absolutely refused to go into Vicksburg, and declared to General Pemberton that he would not obey his orders, and he did, with about 10,000 men, cut his way out in spite of General Grant's cordon. That sturdy lion, General Johnston, pertinaciously urged Pemberton to join him, and not allow himself to be shut up in Vicksburg fortifications. If the evidence of all the events transpiring at this time could be laid before an intelligent jury, the verdict would not be flattering to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prison experience of a Northern soldier. (search)
ar was one of petty skirmishes enlivened by a severe engagement at Princeton, West Va. After the battle, the Union troops under General J. D. Cox fell back to Flat Top Mountain where they remained during the summer. Reports of a general advance by the Southern forces, caused the troops thus guarding the valuable salt works of the Kanawha Valley to fall back to Fayetteville, and summoned General Cox to the aid of General McClellan with the larger portion of his command. In September, General Loring advanced towards the Valley with a rumored force of 10,000 troops. On the 10th of September, they reached the outpost at Fayetteville, W. Va.; here were two regiments the Thirty-fourth and Thirty-seventh Ohio. The skirmishing began in the morning, but it was not until noon that we could see the line advancing, and were ordered to strike tents and prepare for battle. We started at a moderate pace but soon quickened our step, the dust arose so thick we could not see each other when the