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James Russell Lowell, Among my books 30 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 8 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for Paradise Lost or search for Paradise Lost in all documents.

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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
terary world, when it declared that the two great creative minds of the seventeenth century were those which produced Paradise Lost and the Pilgrim's Progress. Thomas Ellwood. commend us to autobiographies! Give us the veritable notchings os look farther: When I came home, and had set myself to read it, I found it was that excellent poem which he entitled Paradise Lost. After I had, with the best attention, read it through, I made him another visit; and, returning his book with due ac; then brake off that dis. course, and fell upon another subject. I modestly but freely told him what I thought of Paradise Lost! What he told him remains a mystery. One would like to know more precisely what the first critical reader of that soinding ascent we see embossed the several monuments of your learned victories. He was one of the first to appreciate Paradise Lost, and to commend it in some admirable lines. One couplet is exceedingly beautiful, in its reference to the author's b