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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. L. Lothrop or search for W. L. Lothrop in all documents.

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B and E Second Infantry; one company of recruits under Lieut. Lothrop, Fourth Artillery; one company of recruits under Serge. Wood, First Infantry; Capt. Steele, Second Infantry; Lieut. Lothrop, Fourth Artillery; Lieut. Caulfield, First Cavalry. Aft by one company of regular infantry under command of Captain Lothrop. This company sustained our retreat with great coolnepany of general service recruits, commanded by First Lieutenant W. L. Lothrop, Fourth Artillery, and a company of mounted rihers on the brow of the hill to our left and front. Lieutenant Lothrop went in command of this company, but was met with suservice he performed with coolness and intrepidity. Lieutenant Lothrop's retreat was followed up by a vigorous attack from t of Captain C. C. Gilbert, of First Infantry; of First Lieutenant Lothrop, Fourth Artillery, and George H. McLaughlin receiive minutes, they drove back and scattered, assisted by Capt. Lothrop and his regular rifle recruits. Totten and Dubois were
y threw a few shells among their pursuers, which, bursting just as they reached the dense mass of humanity, scattered them wounded and lifeless upon the ground by scores, while the balance ran for dear life in every direction. Having driven a regiment of the enemy from one hill, the Missouri Volunteers encountered in the valley beyond another fresh and finely-equipped regiment of Louisianians, whom, after a bitter fight of forty-five minutes, they drove back and scattered, assisted by Capt. Lothrop and his regular rifle recruits. Totten and Dubois were, meanwhile, firing upon the enemies forming in the southwest angle of the valley, and upon their batteries on the opposite hill. The brave and undaunted First, with ranks already thinned by death, again moved forward up the second hill, just on the brow of which they met still another fresh regiment, which poured a terrible volley of musketry into their diminished numbers. Never yielding an inch, they gradually crowded their oppos