Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Lovell or search for Lovell in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
issuing of this order the crew of the captured privateer Savannah was tried The General Price --a Confederate war-boat that changed hands This was one of the fourteen river-steamers condemned and seized for the Confederate Government by General Lovell at New Orleans, January 15, 1862. Converted into a war-boat, she took a bold part in the engagement near Fort Pillow, which resulted in the sinking of the Cincinnati. She arrived on the scene just as the General Bragg was disabled and boldlHollins, C. S. N. General Polk and the whole Mississippi delegation had urged upon the Confederate Congress the fitting out of this independent flotilla, which cost more than the million and a half dollars appropriated for it. The Confederate General Lovell at New Orleans had no faith in its efficiency because of his belief that the fleet was not properly officered. He stated emphatically that fourteen Mississippi captains and pilots would never agree about anything after they once got under wa
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
d Portsmouth, was to stay back with the nineteen mortar schooners that continued to pour their great shells into the forts during the passage of the fleet. General Lovell, in command of the defenses of New Orleans, did not depend entirely upon Colonel Higgins' gunners in Forts St. Philip and Jackson to keep Farragut away from tman, two guns, Captain Alexander Grant. Besides these there were six of the so-called River Defense Fleet--the Warrior, Stonewall Jackson, Defence, Resolute, General Lovell, and R. J. Breckinridge--river steamers with bows strengthened for ramming purposes, all but one of which carried a single small smooth-bore gun. They really ve guns at his disposal, for the Jackson had gone up the river and the Louisiana was scarcely able to move. The River Defense Fleet proved a failure, for, as General Lovell has said, their total want of system, vigilance, and discipline rendered them useless and helpless. Farragut's instructions had been so minute that it seem
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
n May 29th was once more at New Orleans. The 6th of June was memorable for the meeting at Memphis, in which no land forces lent aid or were concerned; where the ramming tactics used by both sides completely proved that this harking-back to an ancient form of naval warfare in confined waters was more destructive than well-aimed guns or heavy broadsides. Three ships were put out of action within fifteen minutes, the Federal Queen of the West, under command of Colonel Ellet, sinking the General Lovell, and in turn being rammed by the General Beauregard so hard that it was necessary to put her ashore. An accidental collision by the General Beauregard and the General Price, two Confederate vessels, put the latter out of commission. The Federal ram Monarch's charge upon the Beauregard took place just as the latter had received a deadly shot from the Benton through her boiler. Only one Confederate ram, the General Van Dorn, escaped destruction. Memphis was now at the mercy of the nava