hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Enoch Louis Lowe or search for Enoch Louis Lowe in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

ressing nature of my official duties, has prevented me from making this publication at an earlier period. The Mayor says: About 12 o'clock P. M., the Hon. E. Louis Lowe and Marshal George P. Kane called at my house, where Gov. Hicks was passing the night, and Marshal Kane informed me that a despatch had been received thatads by which the troops were expected to come should be destroyed, as the only means of averting the consequences referred to, of their coming at that time. E. Louis Lowe, in his certificate, says: Governor Hicks replied that it was a serious affair to undertake to destroy the bridges, and he expressed some doubt as to hiatingly refused my consent to the step. But the people of Maryland are asked to believe that, after this, in the still watches of the night, when requested by Enoch L. Lowe and George P. Kane to consent to the destruction of the bridges, I gave an unequivocal, and decided, and distinct reply in the affirmative. I leave my vindica
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 99.-battle of Scarytown, Va. Fought July 17 (search)
fair. Information having been received at headquarters that the rebels were preparing to make a stand at Scaryville, eight or ten miles above this point, where Scary Creek empties into the Kanawha, Gen. Cox ordered the Twelfth Ohio regiment, Col. Lowe, a portion of two companies of the Twenty-First, the Cleveland Light Artillery, Capt. Cotton, with two rifled six-pounders, and a small cavalry company from Ironton, in all about one thousand men, under the command of Col. Lowe, to proceed up tCol. Lowe, to proceed up the river by land on a reconnoitring expedition. The instructions to the commanding officer were, that if he found the rebels in a position from which they could be easily dislodged, to drive them out; if not, to take a position and hold it till the main body of the army could advance. Col. Norton, of the Twenty-First, who had explored the ground the day previous, accompanied the party, but was only permitted to take with him a fragment of his command. The army is encamped near the mouth of
ed batteries. After proceeding about seven miles, Major Hines came upon the enemy strongly intrenched in a commanding position. Major Hines sent back word to Colonel Lowe, who was one mile behind on the boats with three companies of the Twelfth regiment, to come forward and support him in the attack. Colonel Lowe, not knowing tColonel Lowe, not knowing the position of the enemy, and not expecting to meet the enemy in position on the right hand side of the river, did not feel willing to risk an engagement. After reconnoitring their position, Colonel Lowe thought it advisable to fall back to a safe position, and send word to General Cox, on the opposite side of the river, of the cColonel Lowe thought it advisable to fall back to a safe position, and send word to General Cox, on the opposite side of the river, of the condition of things here. The orders from General Cox were to move forward immediately. In the mean time the main army, under General Cox, had pushed forward and came out upon the Kanawha River, one mile above tile enemy on the right. At this point they found the steamer Julia Maffett, with two flat-boat loads of wheat in tow, d