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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 30 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 27 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 25 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 19 3 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 17 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. 9 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The picturesque pocket companion, and visitor's guide, through Mount Auburn. You can also browse the collection for Charles Lowell or search for Charles Lowell in all documents.

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the Hon. E. Everett acted as Secretary. Great interest and equanimity were expressed in regard to the design of the meeting. It was now voted to purchase Sweet Auburn, provided one hundred subscribers could be obtained, at sixty dollars each; also to appoint a Committee of twenty to report on a general plan of proceedings proper to be adopted towards effecting the objects of the meeting; and the following gentlemen were chosen:--Messrs. Joseph Story, Daniel Webster, H. A. S. Dearborn, Charles Lowell, Samuel Appleton, Jacob Bigelow, Edward Everett, George W. Brimmer, George Bond, A. H. Everett, Abbott Lawrence, James T. Austin, Franklin Dexter, Joseph P. Bradlee, Charles Tappan, Charles P. Curtis, Zebedee Cook, Jr., John Pierpont, L. M. Sargent and George W. Pratt, Esquires. An elaborate Report, on the general objects of the meeting, was on this occasion offered by the previously appointed Committee. See Appendix to this History, No. I. Another meeting was held on the 11th
, Benjamin B. Grant, Benjamin A. Gould, Oliver Hastings, Thomas Hastings, Charles Hickling, Zelotes Hosmer, Daniel Henchman, Elisha Haskell, Abraham Howard, Enoch Hobart, Sarah L. Howe, Zachariah Hicks, Henderson Inches, William Ingalls, Deming Jarves, Charles T. Jackson, Joseph B. Joy, George H. Kuhn, Abel Kendall, Jr. Josiah Loring, Henry Loring, John Lamson, Seth S. Lynde, William Lawrence, Amos Lawrence, Abbott Lawrence, John Lemist, Francis C. Lowell, Charles Lowell, Henry Lienow, Isaac Livermore, Isaac Mead, R. D. C. Merry, Isaac McLellan, Francis J. Oliver, Thomas H. Perkins, Jr. George W. Pratt, Isaac Parker, Samuel Pond, John Pierpont, Francis Parkman, Edward W. Payne, Josiah Quincy, Henry Rice, Ebenezer Rollins, E. A. Raymond, James Read, James Russell, Henry Robinson, John Randall, John P. Rice, John L. Russell, James Savage, James S. Savage, Lucius M. Sargent, Isaac Staples, Charles B. Shaw, P. R. L. Stone, L
ion, have erected this monument. The wide circulation of the standard treatises for schools, particularly those on Algebra and Arithmetic, produced by Mr. Colburn, renders it unnecessary to do more than allude to them. At the same time it is but justice to mention his great zeal in behalf of education at large. Many important improvements in machinery are also due to his ingenuity and scientific research, the fruits of which are especially visible in the manufacturing establishments of Lowell, where he resided, an exceedingly useful and highly respected citizen, about ten years. It is doubtless true to all practical and substantial purposes, as stated in the inscription above quoted, that Mr. Colburn was educated by his genius. It may be proper to add, however, that he was graduated at Harvard College in 1820. His private character was most exemplary. A writer, about the time of his decease, remarked of him justly, that his study through life seemed to be to do good. On Loc