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The Daily Dispatch: July 10, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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the hill; the former went about a square and then sat down. Prisoner pinched him, and started him again, but he had not gone far before he a second time sat down. Prisoner pinched him again. The negro got up, started, staggered against the fence, and sat down. When he had remained there some five or ten minutes, prisoner said Albert was dying, and he would go and surrender himself to the officers, and requested witness to take care of the negro, who soon afterwards breathed his last. S. D. Lowry was present at the whipping, but didn't then think the negro was seriously hurt, and saw none of his skin broken. Robert James went to the scene of the whipping; saw the negro lying on some straw groaning, but supposed he was "putting on;" no handcuffs on the negro then. Marcellus Lane heard and saw the prisoner whipping Albert. Officer Chalkley said he had taken the negro to jail Sunday in good health apparently. Officer Bibb said he on Monday, by order of the Court, had given Albert
Careless handling of fire-arms. --On Tuesday evening, about 8 o'clock, while Mr. S. D. Lowry, an officer of the Central road, was attending to some business on the track near Victor's Mill, a small pistol bullet, discharged from the direction of 17th street, struck his person and after going through his coat and pantaloons entered his left leg, causing a slight wound. As the ball was much flattened and had wood imbedded in it, it must have struck against a fence before reaching Mr. Lowry. The neighborhood where this took place is noted for its rowdy propensities. Indeed, at the time of the occurrence of the above incident, a fight was in progress onad wood imbedded in it, it must have struck against a fence before reaching Mr. Lowry. The neighborhood where this took place is noted for its rowdy propensities. Indeed, at the time of the occurrence of the above incident, a fight was in progress on 17th street, and Mr. Lowry heard five pistols discharged after he was wounded.