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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
progress on the borders of the bay, General Steele, with Hawkins's division of negro troops, and Lucas's cavalry, had been marching from Pensacola to Blakely, ten miles north of Mobile, destroying, During that campaign, of about three weeks, During the siege of Spanish Fort and Blakely, General Lucas went out with all of his command excepting some Massachusetts mounted infantry, taking with dispatches from General Wilson to General Canby, carefully sewed up in the collar of his vest. Lucas furnished him with a guard and mule, and sent him on. From this courier he learned that a Confederate force was at Claiborne, and Lucas determined to capture it. On the way, the First Louisiana Cavalry encountered a mounted force at Mount Pleasant, charged and routed them, and in a pursuit of two miles, by Lucas in full force, he captured two battle-flags, three commissioned officers, and sixty men, with a loss of only five men. Pushing on to Claiborne, he went into camp there, and thither
l's battalion400585  Clark's battalion119158  Hughes' battalion148179  McCown's regiment476653  MacFarlane's regiment547822  Priest's regiment368453  Pritchard's regiment450754  Rosser's battalion281350 Cavalry:    Gates' regiment (dismounted)536777  Hill's company5171  McCulloch's regiment (dismounted)444476  Murphy's company100116  Reves' company5272 Artillery, batteries:    Bledsoe's5376  Clark's91104  Gorham's4350  Guibor's6980  Kelly's    Kneisley's    Landis'6269  Lucas'7072  MacDonald's100100  Teel's [Texas]    Wade's107116 Brig. Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson's brigade701910 Grand total4,9587,866 Dabney H. Maury, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, May 5, 1862. Maj. T. A. Washington, Assistant Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va.: Major: I have the honor to communicate, for the information of the commanding general, the following intelligence, just received by me: A gentleman, my co
Indiana, Col. Mahan; the Sixteenth Indiana, Col. Lucas; the Sixty-ninth Indiana, Lieut.-Col. Korff, attempted to make my escape, accompanied by Col. Lucas, Capt. Baird, and several other officers. W during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday a position at the extreme left, relieving Colonel Lucas. I despatched two companies, B and C, as he dry bed of a creek in front. By order of Col. Lucas I rode to Gen. Manson, who had established hs coming. Our ammunition beginning to fail, Col. Lucas ordered me to distribute cartridges. Not muin line of battle. A report had spread that Col. Lucas was killed. As our gallant little hero camet rest for several nights dropped to sleep. Col. Lucas awakened me to go for more ammunition. Sce of fire, which was answered back from ours. Lucas, Wolfe, and Orr, on their wounded horses, insp cutting off all retreat. Gen. Manson, with Col. Lucas and Major Orr, tore down the fence, thinking[1 more...]
Indiana, Col. Mahan; the Sixteenth Indiana, Col. Lucas; the Sixty-ninth Indiana, Lieut.-Col. Korff, attempted to make my escape, accompanied by Col. Lucas, Capt. Baird, and several other officers. W during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday Going to bed at midnight I was awakened by Col. Lucas with orders to have rations drawn and cookedhe dry bed of a creek in front. By order of Col. Lucas I rode to Gen. Manson, who had established hs coming. Our ammunition beginning to fail, Col. Lucas ordered me to distribute cartridges. Not muin line of battle. A report had spread that Col. Lucas was killed. As our gallant little hero camet rest for several nights dropped to sleep. Col. Lucas awakened me to go for more ammunition. Sce of fire, which was answered back from ours. Lucas, Wolfe, and Orr, on their wounded horses, insp cutting off all retreat. Gen. Manson, with Col. Lucas and Major Orr, tore down the fence, thinking[1 more...]
number one thousand men at least. All day Friday General Lee waited for the infantry and artillery to come up, and this morning, learning that the rebels were falling back toward Pleasant Hill, he started in pursuit with the First brigade, Colonel Lucas; Third brigade, Colonel Robinson; Fourth brigade, Colonel Dudley. The Fourteenth New-York cavalry had the advance, under command of Major Bassford. After marching a distance of fifteen miles, Major Bassford came suddenly upon the enemy, posng back rapidly. Major Bassford pursued them seven miles, killing and wounding some, and taking many prisoners. Fearful of being cut off from the main body, the Major withdrew from the pursuit, but fought them gallantly until the arrival of Colonel Lucas. The Colonel was not long in coming up, and immediately formed his whole brigade in line. He moved forward a short distance, and was met with what promised to be a determined resistance, but they could not withstand the fury of his onslaugh
e on the right of the Shreveport road, and Colonel Lucas's cavalry brigade on the left. The skirmi separated the first from the second field was Lucas's cavalry brigade, mostly dismounted and deploarrived on the ground, and at once ordered Colonel Lucas, commanding First cavalry brigade, up to the support of Colonel Robinson. Colonel Lucas deployed his line and moved forward in fine style, th and six or seven privates were killed. Colonel Lucas, with his First cavalry brigade, closely f discovered masses of the enemy in front. Colonel Lucas deployed his cavalry brigade on the left oisconsin infantry. The cavalry brigade of Colonel Lucas was ordered to act upon the right flank, tilled. Captain Wasson, Inspector-General of Lucas's cavalry brigade, had his stirrup and boot stnth Illinois. Lieutenant Miller, Aid to Colonel Lucas, was wounded in the arm, and taken prisone The cavalry division, except a part of Colonel Lucas's brigade, was not in the action on Saturd[4 more...]
 ShipSt. LouisT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellFairfield, Lincoln, & Co.Boston460 245 ShipDelhiT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellHenry OxnardBoston623 246 BrigPearlSprague & James'sFoster & TaylorRice & ThaxterBoston200 2471839ShipNorwaySprague & James'sSprague & JamesGeorge PrattBoston651 248 ShipLelandGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerA. C. LombardBoston350 249 ShipDamascusJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonBenjamin Rich & SonBoston706 250 ShipSophiaT. Magoun'sP. & J. O. CurtisB. BangsBoston650 251 ShipLucasP. Curtis'sP. CurtisA. C. LombardBoston350 252 ShipCincinnatiJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisA. C. LombardBoston608 253 ShipKremlinT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellEnoch & Samuel TrainBoston & Medford350 254 ShipSt. PetersburgT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellEnoch & Samuel TrainBoston & Medford828 255 ShipPharsaliaT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellT. Magoun & SonMedford617 256 BarkVernonT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellJohn RussellPlymouth304 257 ShipHudsonT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. Ewe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Charleston from July 1st to July 10th, 1864. (search)
ted their attention also to Battery Tynes, under command of Captain Richardson, Lucas' battallion, who returned the fire, and at night this battery shelled the enemyuth Carolina cavalry. The 2d sub-district, embracing the Stono batteries, Major Lucas, the several batteries of the new (southern) lines, Captain Legan, Major Bonwith gallantry under fire, and deserve special mention. The officers were Major Lucas, commanding, and Major Blanding, First South Carolina artillery; Captains Hayne and Richardson, Lucas' battalion, and Rhett and King, First South Carolina artillery; Lieutenants Ogier, Martin, Reverley, Lucas and Ford, Lucas' battalion, and Lucas and Ford, Lucas' battalion, and Stewart, First South Carolina artillery. Lieutenant Ogier is particularly mentioned for his gallantry. The batteries at Fort Lamar, under Lieutenant-Colonel BrownLucas' battalion, and Stewart, First South Carolina artillery. Lieutenant Ogier is particularly mentioned for his gallantry. The batteries at Fort Lamar, under Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, and those on.the southern lines, under Captain Legan, did good service during the continuance of these operations, as did the light batteries under the command of
attery, and, with assistants, did good service. For a more detailed account of the gallantry of the attack on Sumter, I would respectfully invite your attention to the copies of the reports of the different officers under my command, herewith enclosed. I cannot close this report without referring to the following gentlemen: To his Excellency, Governor Pickens, and staff—especially Colonels Lamar and Dearing, who were so active and efficient in the construction of the channel batteries; Colonels Lucas and Moore, for assistance on various occasions; and Colonel Duryea and Mr. Nathan, Chief of the Fire Department, for their gallant assistance in putting out the fire at Fort Sumter when the magazine of the latter was in imminent danger of explosion; General Jamieson, Secretary of War, and General S. R. Gist, AdjutantGen-eral, for their valuable assistance in obtaining and despatching the troops for the attack on Sumter and defence of the batteries; Quartermaster's and Commissary-General'
ion of your Engineer and the Commander of the Second Subdistrict. The woods in front of the lines should be cut into abatis at once, and positions for field-guns in embrasure should be established immediately along them. 2. The batteries commanding approaches through the creeks should be put in perfect order and garrisoned. 3d. A pontoon-bridge should be thrown across Cooper River at the most favorable point, if practicable. 4th. I think you ought to apply for the promotion of Majors Lucas and Manigault, to give them more authority over their battalions. Respectfully yours, G. T. Beaauregard, General. Two days before, General Beauregard had forwarded the following telegrams to the War Department: 1. Charleston, S. C., Dec. 27th, 1864. General S. Cooper, Adjt.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: In event of having to abandon the coast, and enemy's movements will permit a choice of base of operations, shall it be towards North Carolina or Georgia? Latter is true base fo
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