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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
stablished in the middle of the glade on the slope of the hill in a good position, was reinforced by several batteries of artillery, and was flanked on the left by Lucas' cavalry, and on the right by Dudley's; the latter extended into the second glade. Robinson's brigade of cavalry remained in reserve near the train. For nearlys time marched in as close order as possible. As soon as they had passed Natchitoches—that is to say, toward seven in the morning—A. J. Smith fell in behind them; Lucas' brigade of cavalry brought up the rear. As soon as the movement declared itself, Wharton with Steele's cavalry entered Natchitoches, which the Federals had scarcely left, and dashed off in pursuit. He followed them so close that Lucas was obliged to appeal for help to Kilby Smith, whose division formed the rearguard. Ward's brigade of infantry broke the force of Wharton's attacks, who came to a halt at a point called Twenty-four Mile Ferry, where the road for the first time crosses Cane