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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 2 0 Browse Search
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James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Dante. (search)
dst, Love who governest the heavens, Thou knowest who didst lift me with thy light Paradiso, I. 70-75. Perhaps it seems little to say that Dante was the first great poet who ever made a poem wholly out of himself, but, rightly looked at, it implies a wonderful self-reliance and originality in his genius. His is the first keel that ever ventured into the silent sea of human consciousness to find a new world of poetry. La acqua cha io prendo giammai non si corse. Paradiso, II. 7. Lucretius makes the same boast:— Avia Pieridum peragro loca nullius ante Trita solo. He discovered that not only the story of some heroic person, but that of any man might be epical; that the way to heaven was not outside the world, but through it. Living at a time when the end of the world was still looked for as imminent, Convito, Tr. IV. c. 15. he believed that the second coming of the Lord was to take place on no more conspicuous stage than the soul of man; that his kingdom would be establis