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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 171 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 83 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 40 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 27 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 20 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 16 4 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 13 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 1 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Theodore Lyman or search for Theodore Lyman in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Introduction (search)
Introduction Theodore Lyman — man of science — soldier — and man of the world — touched life at many points. He could reatened to be un diner manque. The chairman next called on Lyman, who regretted that the previous proceedings had been tingewife of Governor Winthrop and her children. The first Theodore Lyman, a direct descendant of Richard in the fifth generatioplished Mary Henderson of New York. Their only son, Theodore Lyman, the third of that name, and author of the present letns while maintaining a broad interest in the outside world, Lyman became the authority of his day on that group. In 1858 her of George R. Russell, an East India merchant of Boston. Lyman took his bride home to his Brookline house, where they liveome. In the winter of 1856, the year after he graduated, Lyman was sent by Agassiz on a scientific pilgrimage to Florida w disposal, and was delighted to have the chance of offering Lyman the hospitalities of his floating home, for a far less agr
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Maps [drawn by Colonel Lyman] (search)
Maps [drawn by Colonel Lyman] The Rapidan51 From the Rapidan to Spotsylvania Court House86 The Attack on the Salient113 From Tolopotamoy Creek to Chickahominy River117 The North and South Annas and Pamunkey River120 Richmond-Petersburg155 Between Petersburg and Richmond215 Jerusalem Plank Road and Weldon Railroad218 Boydton Plank Road and Hatcher's Run328 High Bridge to Appomattox Court House336 Namozine Road to Jetersville342 Appomattox Court House344 Boydton Plank Road347 George Gordon Meade
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
I. First months Theodore Lyman reached Boston early in June 1863, hoping to obtain a Staff appoLouis Agassiz's newly built museum. Many of Lyman's friends thought that his desire to join the Soon came Gettysburg; and shortly afterward Mrs. Lyman's cousin, Robert Shaw, fell at the head of hly expect me to do. [Armed with this letter Lyman was soon in the possession of his commission aed the General himself, who cried out, Hulloo, Lyman! How are you? just as he used to. He was as . Meade also crossed the river into Virginia. Lyman joined the army in the midst of the manoeuvres the enemy. It is quite extraordinary, writes Lyman, what little information is to be had. The ideaction at the Capitol. At Centreville, writes Lyman, we had a set — to between Meade and Halleck. erly, poked his head into the tent saying: Colonel Lyman, the General will have breakfast at seven t, and an elegant pair of trousers! Now then, Lyman, are you ready? Where's Humphreys? Humphreys[6 more...]
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
II. in winter quarters [toward the end of December, the army being then well settled in winter quarters, Lyman obtained leave of absence, passed Christmas at home, and returned to the army about the middle of January. He found Headquarters almost deserted, General Meade sick in Philadelphia with an attack of inflammation of, said General Humphreys, I must go across and look about, while there is light left. I don't want many to go. McClellan, you will come; and Major Biddle and Colonel Lyman, if you would like, I shall be glad of your company. So off we four rode, and met Warren coming back, before we got to the river. But he at once turned horserebellion, namely, to destroy the military power of the Rebels. Their great armies must be overwhelmed, and there will end their hopes. . . . [A few days later Lyman left for the North on a three weeks leave. While he was dining in Washington, at Willard's, General Grant On February 29 Congress revived the grade of Lieutena
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
trap them when the Union Army got into the woods. Lyman's letters for the first ten days are short, hasty nofall back to his former position Of this incident Lyman writes in his journal: 2.45. Griffin comes in, follarly on that Friday the 6th of May, you may depend. Lyman, said the General, I want you to take some orderliesn. About this time I returned to General Hancock. Lyman says in his journal: 1.15 (about). Back to Hancock. nized the difference of the Western Rebel fighting.--Lyman's Journal, May 6. Ah! General, Robert Lee is not Peis dislike of Warren and ill-feeling against Meade.--Lyman's Journal. . . . I think there was more nervous pros bay and throwing up breastworks. [At this period Lyman was in the habit of writing a few lines about the ev partial and ill-concerted and dilatory movements. --Lyman's Journal. . . . May 12, 1864 This was the date nfidently assumed by those who knew a little more. --Lyman's Journal. The breastwork made a ridge between, and
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
an assault made at 6 o'clock this evening! --Lyman's Journal. a couple of miles from the Point. ed to me that someone had said that Hal's Mrs. Lyman's brother. regiment was there; so, as I pass(I don't think anybody felt any too pleasant.) Lyman, you are behind time! I had the satisfaction now I give way myself; but it is unworthy. --Lyman's Journal. was there also, sitting under the ted himself totally unfit to command a corps. --Lyman's Journal. June 24, 1864 It is praise not mies or other great ones of this earth. Well, Lyman, you're back, are you? Yes, sir: I reported tess battles, when I heard Hancock say that Colonel Lyman had been useful to him, the day before. Te description of what followed, is copied from Lyman's Journal. ] So astounded was the enemy andgage was packed, ready to go into Petersburg --Lyman's Journal. At 11.30 A. M. Headquarters mountedorrected it, and Meade should have known it! --Lyman's Journal. August 20, 1864 A brigade of ca[14 more...]
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), V. Manoeuvres about Petersburg (search)
V. Manoeuvres about Petersburg [ if we only could have been a little quicker and more driving, we might have had Petersburg at a mouthful, wrote Lyman some days after the Army of the Potomac had crossed the James. The strategy of Grant had deceived Lee, who failed to divine the movement, and did nothing therefore to impede it. Rhodes, IV, 488. Butler, in command of the Army of the James, was encamped at Bermuda Hundred. Grant ordered him to advance and capture Petersburg. But Butler did not rise to the occasion; he sent only part of his forces, under Baldy Smith, who had reinforced Butler, which captured some strong outer fortifications but which did not advance on the city, although it was feebly garrisoned. When Grant and Meade arrived, the town had been reinforced. The attacks of June 16, 17, and 18 were repulsed with great loss to the Union forces. No new assaults were ordered, and the investment of Petersburg began.]
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
VI. the siege of Petersburg [the next day Lyman was surprised to have Meade say to him. I think I must order you home to get me some ca fifteen-day leave, and the aides tendered their congratulations. Lyman was bound for Richmond on secret service! So the Staff persuaded tecovered, however, when tendered a cocktail as a peace offering. Lyman's visit to the North proved longer than he expected. For, shortly after his arrival in Beverly, where Mrs. Lyman was passing the summer, he had an attack of malaria which kept him in bed for some time. Accorby the way; and, secondly, to prevent Lee from reinforcing Early. --Lyman's Journal. I never miss, you see. Rosey drew me aside with an air oe trees. This was all for that day in the way of fighting. [Colonel Lyman wrote on October 4 the following paragraph:] October 4, 1864 at it was quite pleasant all round. [In writing some days later, Lyman thus describes the country over which this engagement was fought:]
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
well be, with a letter of appointment in his pocket) and stood in front of his tent, joking with his aides, a very rare performance with him. Now here's Lyman, Lyman, being a volunteer aide, was not eligible for a brevet. said he, looking like Mephistopheles in good humor, he has no brevet, but I am going to write to the Govern bed; thus missing a letter home to you. However, I have not before missed one in a very long time; and, if I followed Duane's advice, I should miss much oftener. Lyman, says this ancient campaigner, you are foolish to write so much. Now I write only once a week, so my letters are valued. You write every day, and probably Mrs. LMrs. Lyman puts them in her pocket and pays no attention to them. Ah! I was speaking of Miles, and had got him with all his forces, and put him inside the works, all right. We had to pay farewell respects to Riddle, for his resignation has been accepted and he goes to-morrow. For a long time he has been in miserable health and, in wa
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
efore Petersburg, Meade chaffingly remarked to Lyman one day toward the end of December: I have a Christmas present for Mrs. Lyman--a certain worthless officer whom I shall send home to her. And tham a 300-day leave, with the understanding that Lyman was to return with the opening of the active c in the spring. Toward the end of February, Lyman became restless, and fearing that operations m Losses in the Civil War in America, 135-137. Lyman's estimate at the time was 12,000 and 50,000. into his tent and cried out very actively: Now Lyman, where are all my young men? I want all of thbed. The victory was so overwhelming that all Lyman actually wrote home that night was:] Headquarear Mimi:-- the Rebellion has gone up! Theodore Lyman Lt.-Col. & Vol. A. D.C. April 3, 1865 ter his son Roonie, He was at Harvard with Lyman. who was about there somewhere. It was the Laquarters Army of Potomac April 19, 1865 Lt.-Col. Theo. Lyman, A. D. C. Colonel:--In parting with [1 more...]
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