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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 171 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 83 3 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 40 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 27 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 20 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 16 4 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 13 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. You can also browse the collection for Theodore Lyman or search for Theodore Lyman in all documents.

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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Francis J. Child (search)
manufacturer, a worthy man but very ignorant, who afterwards became governor of the State, was renominated; and when it was proposed to make the nomination unanimous Professor Child called out such an emphatic No that it seemed to shake the whole assembly. Not content with this he entered a protest next day in the Boston Advertiser. He was so much used up by the exertion that he was unable to attend to his classes. Some years later he enjoyed the satisfaction of seeing his candidate, Theodore Lyman, nominated and elected. Emerson once delivered a lecture in Boston on university life in which he made the rather bold statement that in the course of twenty years the rank-list is likely to become inverted. One of Professor Child's class paraphrased this lecture for a theme, and against the sentence above quoted the Professor wrote: A statement frequently made, but what is the fact? I do not think he liked Emerson quite so well after this, and he can hardly be blamed for feeling s