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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi, (search)
98 William C. C. Claiborne appointed July 10, 1801 Robert Williams appointed 1804 David Holmesappointed March, 1809 State governors. David Holmes term begins Nov. 1817 George Poindexter term begins Nov. 1819 Walter Leaketerm beginsNov. 1821 Lieut.-Gov. Gerard C. Brandon actingNov. 1825 David Holmesterm beginsNov. 1825 Gerard C. Brandonterm beginsNov. 1827 Abram W. Scott term beginsNov. 1831 Lieut.-Gov. Fountain Winston actingNov. 1833 Hiram G, Runnelsterm begins Jan. 1834 Charles Lynchterm beginsJan. 1836 Alexander G. McNutt, Democratterm beginsJan. 1838 Tilgham M. Tucker, Democratterm beginsJan. 1842 Albert G, Brown, Democratterm beginsJan. 1844 Joseph W. Matthews, Democratterm beginsJan. 1848 John A. Quitman, Democratterm beginsJan. 1850 John Isaac Guion, pres. of the Senate, acting, Feb. 3, 1851 James Whitefield, pres. of the Senate,term begins Nov. 25, 1851 Henry S. Foote, Union term begins Jan. 1852 John J. McRae term beginsJan. 1854 William McWillie ter
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Regulators. (search)
reason (June 19). These events caused fierce hatred of British rule in the region below the Roanoke. After the close of the Cherokee War, the western districts of South Carolina were rapidly settled by people of various nationalities, but mostly by Scotch-Irish, Germans, and immigrants from the Northern provinces. Among these was a lawless class, for the summary punishment of which the better sort of people associated themselves under the name of Regulators. This vigilance committee, or Lynch law, was strongly protested against, for abuses followed its exercise. The people claimed the just right of trial by jury. Governor Montague sent a commissioner in 1766 to investigate the matter, who arrested some of the Regulators and sent them to Charleston. Two parties were formed, and nearly came to blows. They were pacified by the establishment of district courts, but ill-feeling continued, and the opponents of the Regulators, taking sides with Parliament in the rising disputes, f
William Barnes. Co. D.James Dunn. John W. Gallagher. Henry G. Fuller. Michael Hogan. Philip Hunt. William Hamilton. Charles Harris. Fred W. Hubner. Andrew P. Green. Michael Gahagin. Co. D.Frank Heill. Charles Ferguson. William Smith. Co. E.William Johnson, Corporal. Julius Rieser. James M. Harrison. Henry Hagedon. Michael Holligan. Alfred Horstman. Peter Kennedy. William B. Kelley. Rodney King. Michael Kenney. George Jones. Robert Slocum. Henry Urban. Co. F.Charles Lynch, Corporal. George Doherty. Jeremiah Lucius. John Larouche. James Lynch. Frank Lopez. William Marshall. John McDonald. Charles Matthews. John M. Duncan. John Mack. Philip Morton. Nelson E. Knights, Sergeant (re-enlisted Jan. 3.) Co. G.Daniel Daley (Jan. 27th, to Co. I.) James N. Barrett. Lewis McCrillis. John Wheeling. Thomas Waters. John Young. Joseph A. White. Co. G.William White. George Wood. Lewis Waldick. Co. H.Florence McCarty. Charles Mortimer. Dominick
.................................... 104 Lucius, Jeremiah,..................................................... 292 Lucy, George,........................................................ 105 Ludlow, James,..................................................... 341 Lummus, Benjamin,............................................... 203, 329 Lurvey, James T.,................................................. 4, 8, 50 Lyford, John,........................................................ 331 Lynch, Charles,....................................................... 292 Lynch, James,........................................................ 292 Lynchburg, Va.,.................................... 337 Lyons, Martin,...................................................... 143 Mace, George,..................................................... 95, 105 Mack, John,......................................................... 292 Mack, Thomas,....................................................... 290 M
; Niemeyer, William F., lieutenant-colonel; Stewart, William H., major, lieutenant-colonel; Wilson, Samuel M., colonel. Sixty-second Mounted Infantry regiment (also called First Virginia Partisan Rangers): Doyle, Robert L., lieutenant-colonel; Hall, Houston, major; Imboden, George W., major; Lang, David B., major, lieutenant-colonel; Smith, George H., colonel: Imboden, John D., colonel. Sixty-third Infantry regiment: Dunn, David C., lieutenantcol-onel; French, James M., major, colonel; Lynch, Connally H., lieutenant-colonel; McMahon, John J., colonel. Sixty-fourth Mounted Infantry regiment (formed from Twenty-first [Pound Gap] battalion): Gray, Harvey, major; Pridemore, Auburn L., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Richmond, James B., major, lieutenant-colonel; Slemp, Campbell, colonel. Sixty-fourth Militia regiment: Dillard, John L., colonel. Sixty-seventh Militia regiment: Cunningham, John F., major; Robinson, Israel, lieutenant-colonel; Sencendiver, Jacob, colonel. Seve
e fall of a part of the capitol at Richmond. It is probable that the injuries received on this occasion caused in part the blindness from which he suffered for some years. With the exception of poor eyesight he was in the best of health until about a year before his death, which occurred February 11, 1895, after a short illness. Brigadier-General James Dearing Brigadier-General James Dearing, of Virginia, was born in Campbell county, April 25, 1840. He was a great-grandson of Col. Charles Lynch, of revolutionary fame, who, through his summary way of treating the Tories, gave his name what is now known as lynch law. He was educated at Hanover academy, Virginia, and was appointed a cadet in the United States military academy. He resigned as soon as the adherence of Virginia to the Confederacy was determined upon, and entered the Confederate army. He chose the artillery service at the outset, becoming a lieutenant of the Washington artillery, of New Orleans, a fine organizati
sland to Point Lookout, Md., and detained several months after the surrender of Lee. The Eighteenth Arkansas was organized at Devall's Bluff on White river, by the election of Col. D. W. Carroll, of Pine Bluff; Lieut.-Col. John L. Daly, of Camden, and Maj. Robert H. Crockett, of DeWitt. The company commanders were: Company A, Captain Thompson; Company B, Capt. (Rev.) R. B. Thrasher; Company C, Capt. James Peel; Company D, Captain Robertson; Company E, Captain. Barnett; Company G, Capt. Charles Lynch; Company H, Capt. W. N. Parrish; Company I, Capt. Samuel Southerland; Company K, Capt. D. W. Carroll, succeeded by W. F. Owen. The regiment numbered 1,000 when it was sent to Fort Pillow, but was decimated by disease and ordered to Corinth, Miss., where it continued to suffer from sickness, as did the entire army, due to rain and unwholesome water from pits dug about the camp. Colonel Carroll was compelled to relinquish his position because of ill health. Thereupon J. L. Daly was c
who had been shot through the foot. I offered him some water. He said, I thank you, General, one of your men just gave me some water. I said, Whose troops are you? He replied, Cabell's. I said, It was pretty hot fighting there. He answered, Yes, General, you licked us good, but we gave you the best we had in the ranch! Among the killed in Cabell's brigade were Col. H. P. Johnson (Maj. D. W. Jones reported dead), of the Twentieth; Major Dowdell, Twenty-first; Col. J. L. Daly and Captain Lynch, Eighteenth, and Captain Atkins, Rapley's battalion. Colonel Cravens (whose horse was shot under him) and Lieutenant-Colonel Matheny, Twenty-first; Colonel Dockery, Nineteenth; Lieutenant-Colonels Dismukes and Fletcher, Majors Williams and Wilson, and Captain Ashford, commanding Rapley's sharpshooters, were particularly distinguished. General Cabell also commended the bravery of his staff, Maj. John King, adjutant-general; Captain Balfour, inspector-general; Lieut. Marshall Hairston, a
Passengers per Steamship Roanoke, Geo. W. Couch, master, from New York, Nov. 9th: C. B. Hunt, Isaac Dozier, D. Cramer, Thomas Morgan, Chas. Lynch, Geo. W. Emmons, L. J. Carland, Miss Gill, Miss Platt, Chas T. McKenzie, Geo. Burns, Jno. Ryder, Thos. Munston, D. K. Leach, W. H. Prime, Charles L. Prime, Mrs. Driscoll, M. Hess. W. H. Mulson, J. O. Sefts, Dr. G. W. Briggs, Allan Gilmore, M. Gilmore, John Dunlop, and 12 in steerage. Passengers per Steamship Jamestown, T. Skinner, master, from New York, Nov. 10th: J. Martin, M. Gayon, W B. Osborne, Mrs. Phelps, 2 children and servant, H. Raynard, Mrs. Ashe, 2 children and servant, Miss Emerson, J. Rowe. Mrs. Meem, Geo. Tennant, Wm. Tennant, C. S. Dawson, Miss Davis, M. George, Miss Johnson and child, M. Johnson. H. G. Rodman, Mrs. Nelson, Geo. Dickinson, Sam. Shelter, and 7 in steerage.