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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 10 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for Lynde or search for Lynde in all documents.

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vered . . . though a box was received from Boston a short time after the regiment left Baltimore. Hanson's 6th Regiment, p. 48. Governor Andrew ordered the bodies brought tenderly. So lately as July 21, 1894, the usually accurate Boston Transcript stated that only three Massachusetts men fell at Baltimore. Thirty-six were wounded, including Captain Dike of Stoneham, who was severely wounded in the thigh, was taken in and secreted in a hotel and was supposed to have been killed, and Lieutenants Lynde and Rowe, all of Co. L. The band was sent back to Boston and the unarmed Pennsylvania force to Philadelphia. Twelve of the Baltimore men were killed. War was fairly inaugurated by the shedding of blood, a thing which had not occurred during the contest at Fort Sumter. The best and most careful account of the whole affair at Baltimore is that entitled Baltimore and the 19th of April, 1861, by George Wm. Brown, chief judge of the supreme bench of Baltimore and mayor of the city in