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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 26, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, chapter 4 (search)
an always be relied upon to send from obscurity a Lincoln or a Grant in time of imminent need. Beyond all these, perhaps, in total influence ranks the great army of women teachers, spreading their unseen and daily labors through every school district from Cape Cod to the Golden Gate; smoothing the waste places, equalizing all our civilization, doing the most for the poorest; and again, in the upper regions of education, rising into the work of such missionaries of the highest training as Mary Lyon in the past, or Alice Freeman in the present. Compared with these lives, how petty seem the little struggles for position and etiquette? In what lingering childishness does the most exalted womanhood of Europe seem still to be involved when we read in the telegraphic headings, Great indignation of Queen Victoria, and find that this excitement relates, not to the tremendous Irish problem and the threatened dismemberment of her empire, but to the hesitation of certain courts of Europe to a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, Index. (search)
, Prince, 106. Leroi, Madame, 87. Leslie, Eliza, 13. letters, women's, 110. Libraries, public, 282. Lincoln, Abraham, 20, 218, 309. Lioness more formidable than lion, 59, 145. Literary centre unimportant, 225. literary style, women's influence on, 85. Livermore, Mary A., 20. Lochinvar, the young, 55. Longfellow, H. W., 19, 203, 308. Lotze, Hermann, quoted, 90. Louis XIV., 179. Lowell, J. R., quoted, 171, 212, 291. Also 95, 97, 99. Lucas, Mrs., John, 287. Lyon, Mary, 21. Lytton, Lord, 193. M. Maiden aunts, 38. Maiden ladies, dignity of, 31. Maine, Sir Henry, cited, 10. Maitland, Major, 137. Manugin, Arthur, quoted, 214. Mann, Horace, quoted, 134. Also 243, 244. Manners, American, 101, 169, 224; English, 139; Italian and Spanish, 25. manners, the Empire of, 75. Mariotti. See Gallenga. Marketable accomplishments, 60. Marriage, chances of, 65. Marshall, Emily, 177. Martincan, Harriet, quoted, 7, 228. Also 13, 263.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
. Willard wrote many textbooks and was credited by her generation with opening to women the masculine subjects of mathematics and the descriptive sciences. The pioneer work of Mrs. Willard in founding the Troy Academy was followed by that of Mary Lyon in the founding of Mount Holyoke Seminary (1837). Miss Lyon's one contribution to literature, aside from the circular of the institution, was Female education (1839), which was but an enlarged prospectus of the Seminary and a defence of the typMiss Lyon's one contribution to literature, aside from the circular of the institution, was Female education (1839), which was but an enlarged prospectus of the Seminary and a defence of the type of education then offered to girls. By a narrow margin the institution escaped being labelled The Pangynaikean Seminary, and by a margin quite as narrow did the education offered vary from the traditional formal education of young men. The tendency to make women's newly won privilege a mere copy of the formal education offered to men is revealed in a yet more extreme form in the next step, the establishment of the first women's college, Vassar, in 1861. Nevertheless the literary documents
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ouisiana (Garreau), 592, 593 Louisiana studies, 598 Lounsbury, T. R., 475, 485-487 Lovejoy, 247 n., 265 n. Lover's Lane, 284 Lowell, Amy, 65 Lowell, J. R., 36, 47, 64, 72, 113, 115, 117, 119, 302, 305, 306, 307, 313, 415, 416, 459, 472, 482, 482 n., 488, 489, 490, 549, 563, 570 Lowell, Percival, 312 Lucian, 467 Luck of roaring camp, 73, 290 Lurella, 512 Lussan, A., 592, 596 Luther, Martin, 382, 556 Luther, Seth, 436 Lutheran Bible, 574 Lyell, 229 Lyon, Mary, 411 Lyrick works of Horace translated into English verse, 445 Lyrics for a Lute, 52 Lyrics of joy, 52 Mabie, Hamilton Wright, 109, 112, 125 McAffie's confession, 514 Macaulay, 77, 126, 462 McCarthy, 365 MacDowell, 49 Mach, Ernst, 251 MacKaye, Percy, 277, 296 MacKaye, Steele, 276, 277, 279 Mackenzie, 54 I Mackintosh, Sir, James, 454 McClellan, G. B., 182, 322 McClure, S. S., 316 McClure, Wm., 399 McClure's, 301, 316, 317, 318 McConnell, Matthew,
en; the cellar and well were visible recently. He d. 7 Dec. 1709, a. 33 ears 3 months and 12 days, as inscribed on his gravestone; his w. Mary m. Nathaniel Robbins before 1720, and Samuel Lyon of Roxbury 24 Nov. 1742, after whose death she returned to her former dwelling, and d. here 2 Mar. 1760, a. 83. The epitaph on her gravestone was prob. written by her son, Rev. Thomas Prentice of Chs., and as a tribute of filial affection is worthy of preservation; Here lyes interr'd the body of Mrs. Mary Lyon, in her first marriage consort to Mr. Thomas Prentice whom she survived more than 50 years, and expired March the 2d 1760, in the 84th year of her age, not impatient of life, but satisfied with it: Her children rise up, and call her blessed. 11. Stephen, s. of Solomon (7), m. Judith Frost of Chs. 8 July 1708; she d. and he m. Faith——; she d. 23 Jan. 1741-2, and he m. Lydia Prentice 10 Nov. 1743. He was a cordwainer, and res. on the westerly side of North Avenue, a few rods south of t
en; the cellar and well were visible recently. He d. 7 Dec. 1709, a. 33 ears 3 months and 12 days, as inscribed on his gravestone; his w. Mary m. Nathaniel Robbins before 1720, and Samuel Lyon of Roxbury 24 Nov. 1742, after whose death she returned to her former dwelling, and d. here 2 Mar. 1760, a. 83. The epitaph on her gravestone was prob. written by her son, Rev. Thomas Prentice of Chs., and as a tribute of filial affection is worthy of preservation; Here lyes interr'd the body of Mrs. Mary Lyon, in her first marriage consort to Mr. Thomas Prentice whom she survived more than 50 years, and expired March the 2d 1760, in the 84th year of her age, not impatient of life, but satisfied with it: Her children rise up, and call her blessed. 11. Stephen, s. of Solomon (7), m. Judith Frost of Chs. 8 July 1708; she d. and he m. Faith——; she d. 23 Jan. 1741-2, and he m. Lydia Prentice 10 Nov. 1743. He was a cordwainer, and res. on the westerly side of North Avenue, a few rods south of t
ows. From the ladies of Louisville, Blount co., Tennessee--11 blankets, 17 comforts. From Mrs. John Browden and Mrs. Alexander, Tennessee--7 comforts, 3 blankets, 3 pillows. From Mrs. Cox, Mrs. Saffell, Mrs. Love Mrs. Hudson, Mrs. Taylor, Louisville, Tennessee--21 blankets, 7 quilts. From M. P. Burkhart and others, Rodgersville, Tenn.--6 blankets, 7 bed-quilts From Mrs. Martha Johnson, S. Sensaborough, and Misses F. & R. Davis--5 blankets, 2 bed-quilts. From Mrs. Mary Lyon and 9 other ladies, Hawkins county, Tenn.--27 blankets, 7 bed-quilts. From Mrs. Harmony, Baptist Church, McMinn county, Tenn.--29 blankets, 11 bed-quilts, 9 sheets. 4 pillows, 61 slips. From Walnut Grove, Green county, Tenn.--6 blankets, 14 bed- quilts, 4 pillows. From New Canton, Hawkins county, Tenn.--30 blankets, 16 towels, 21 sheets, 17 comforts. From Mrs. Sarah E. Colloutry, Knox county, Tenn.--2 blankets, 3 quilts, 2 pillows. From Mrs. Donaldson and Mrs. H