hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
tributors of essays as the strongest writer on the paper. Much of the best writing, and of the rankest scurrility, be it said, was produced by editors born and trained abroad, like Bache of the Aurora, Cobbett, Cooper, Gales, Cheetham, Callender, Lyon, and Holt. Of the whole number of papers in the country towards the end of the decade, more than one hundred and fifty, at least twenty opposed to the administration were conducted by aliens. The power wielded by these anti-administration editors impressed John Adams, who in 1801 wrote: If we had been blessed with common sense, we should not have been overthrown by Philip Freneau, Duane, Callender, Cooper, and Lyon, or their great patron and protector. A group of foreign liars encouraged by a few ambitious native gentlemen have discomfited the education, the talents, the virtues, and the prosperity of the country. The most obvious example of that Federalist lack of common sense was the passage of the Alien and Sedition laws in 1797
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
emorate a seventeen-year-old lieutenant killed in the attack on Fort Henry, and the year after published his masterpiece, The old Sergeant, which Holmes thought the finest thing since the war began,— the death-scene of a nameless soldier wounded at Shiloh. Richer in melody than Brownell, Willson was like him in directness and realism; his output, however, was very slight. The struggle for the possession of Missouri was recorded in Stoddard's The little Drummer, Henry Peterson's The death of Lyon, and Boker's Zagonyi. During the Confederate attempt to recapture Corinth in October, 1862, the Eighth Wisconsin imaginatively carried, instead of a flag, a live eagle which circled over the battlefield and which gave Brownell his occasion for The Eagle of Corinth. This same year on the sea the duel between the Merrimac and the Cumberland stirred the poets as did almost no other episode of the entire war. Thomas Buchanan Read wrote The attack; Longfellow, The Cumberland; Boker, On Board
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
303 Davis, Charles Augustus, 151 Davis, Jefferson, 142 Davis, Rebecca Harding, 372 Davis, Richard H., 388, 392, 393 Davy and the Goblin, 408 Day is done, the, 41 Deacon's Week, the, 373 Death in the School Room, 262 n. Death of Lyon, the, 281 Death of Stonewall Jackson, 307 Death of Wind-Foot, The, 262 n. De Bow's review, 313 Decanter of Madeira, 242 Deephaven, 382 Defence of liberal Christianity, 210 Defoe, 12, 68, 148, 374 Deland, Margaret Wade, 390 Del, 242, 245-257, 259, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 286, 303, 349, 362, 364 Lowell, Robert Traill Spence, 197 Loyal, 306 Lucas, D. B., 300, 302, 309 Luck of Roaring camp, the, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 384 Lucy books, 400 Lydgate, 3 Lyon, Mathew, 181 Lyra Elegantiarum, 239 Lyrics of a day, 278 Lyrics of lowly life, 351, 351 n. Mabel Martin, 48 Mably, G. Bonnot de, 127 Macaulay, 95, 209, 317 McCabe, William Gordon, 291, 300, 303, 311 McCarthy, Harry, 291, 292 McClu
ouis. For daring to write and print his thoughts, he is deemed guilty of treason and his press silenced. For exercising the dearest right of a freeman — freedom of speech — the tyranny of a despotic ruler is brought to bear against him, and he is deprived of his personal liberty. This act of the Abolition agents of the central power exceeds in atrocity the tyranny of old John Adams under the odious sedition laws of 1800, and Mr. Tucker is the subject of a greater indignity than was Mathew Lyon, of revolutionary memory. The latter was placed in durance under the operation of a tyranical law, which, although passed by Congress, was condemned by the people as soon as their voice could be expressed; Mr. Tucker is the victim of a tyrani's will which seems destined to become, wherever his power is recognized, absolute. In America, as in France, the press to in only reflect the wishes of the Government — the interests of the governed must be lost sight of. The Bastile is transf<