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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 21, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. H. Lytle or search for W. H. Lytle in all documents.

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e Union sharp-shooters. A rebel account. Chattanooga, June 8, 1862. The shelling of Chattanooga by the enemy's forces, commenced yesterday afternoon about half-past 5 P. M. It was known that a portion of Gen. Mitchel's forces, under Gen. Lytle, was approaching this point from Winchester, Tennessee, where they had been committing all kinds of robbery and outrage. On Wednesday, the fourth inst., Col. Adams, who is in command of all the cavalry forces here, allowed himself to be surprif this place, on the road leading from Winchester to Jasper. He made his escape with the loss of only six men, instead of twenty, as reported. It is supposed that this force, estimated from one thousand five hundred to three thousand, under Gen. Lytle, came through Haley's Cut-off, a gorge in the mountain of Waldron's Ridge, already described, two miles this side of Kelly's Ferry, which is ten miles below this point, and reached the opposite side of the river yesterday morning. Their main b
in, commanding the Twenty-eighth brigade; Col. W. H. Lytle, of the Tenth Ohio, commanding the Seventh was promptly done. I then sent a order to Col. Lytle to form his brigade on the right in good poss final struggle on the left, I had heard that Lytle's brigade was outflanked on the right by an ov to retire, which it did under the orders of Col. Lytle, who was at the same moment wounded, as he tlly and with alacrity all that men could do. Col. Lytle, of the Seventeenth brigade, fell severely wurselves with ammunition, when, hearing that Col. Lytle, my brigade commander, was killed, and beingsseau's division, the Seventeenth brigade, Colonel Lytle, to the right, and most of it upon the eas as he belonged to the Tenth Ohio, and was Colonel Lytle's orderly. He was not with his own regier pass away. The Seventeenth brigade (Col. W. H. Lytle, of the Tenth Ohio, commanding) formed, a as they do so. The noble, gifted, generous Lytle, the Chevalier Bayard of the Ohio troops, was [9 more...]