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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 84 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for T. B. Macaulay or search for T. B. Macaulay in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
night—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to abolish capital executions for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an enthusiastic student of Bacon, editing the works, and writing the life of the philosopher. His edition was the text of Macaulay's famous article in the Edinburgh Review. His daughter married Bryan Waller Procter, who, as an author, adopted the pseudonym of Barry Cornwall, and died in 1874, at the age of eighty-seven. Adelaide Anne Procter, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed with him, and ever after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relation
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
night—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to abolish capital executions for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an enthusiastic student of Bacon, editing the works, and writing the life of the philosopher. His edition was the text of Macaulay's famous article in the Edinburgh Review. His daughter married Bryan Waller Procter, who, as an author, adopted the pseudonym of Barry Cornwall, and died in 1874, at the age of eighty-seven. Adelaide Anne Procter, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed with him, and ever after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relation
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
the form of Conversations. Every girl, said Macaulay, who has read Mrs. Marcet's little dialogues eated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's Life of Macathe only man who ever succeeded in dominating Macaulay. With his vigor and fervor, says the historihim at a dinner at Adolphus's, where also was Macaulay, just returned from Italy. He arrived in Le. I now understand Sydney Smith, who called Macaulay a tremendous machine for colloquial oppressio. XXX., Feb. 9, 1836, gives a description of Macaulay's conversation at this time, not unlike Sumnead a small but very pleasant company,—Bulwer, Macaulay, Hare Francis George Hare, 1786-1842; eldeit was a relief from the incessant ringing of Macaulay's voice to hear Bulwer's lisping, slender, anore to be valued than his. I have spoken with Macaulay about an American edition of his works. He hntier, the news of which has just reached us. Macaulay was dinning, but more subdued than I have eve[8 more...
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
gan is Mrs. Shelley. I passed an evening with her recently. She is sensible, agreeable, and clever. There were Italians and French at her house, and she entertained us all in our respective languages. She seemed to speak both French and Italian quite gracefully. You have doubtless read some of Mrs. Marcet's Jane Haldimand Marcet, 1785-1858. She endeavored to simplify science by stating the principles of chemistry and political economy in the form of Conversations. Every girl, said Macaulay, who has read Mrs. Marcet's little dialogues on political economy could teach Montague or Walpole many lessons in finance.—Essay on Milton. productions. I have met her repeatedly, and received from her several kind attentions. She is the most ladylike and motherly of all the tribe of authoresses that I have met. Mrs. Austin I have seen frequently, and recently passed an evening at her house. She is a fine person,—tall, well-filled, with a bright countenance slightly inclined to be red. S
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
th introduced him to Lord Holland, who had asked if he could recommend any clever young Scotch medical man to accompany him to Spain.—Sydney Smith's Memoir, by Lady Holland, Chap. II. Lady Holland treated him quite unceremoniously,—according to Macaulay, like a negro slave.—Trevelyan's Life of Macaulay, Vol. I. Chap. IV. Allen was not a believer in the Christian religion, and on this subject gave a tone to the conversation of Holland House.—Greville's Memoirs, Chap. XXX., Dec. 16, 1835. theMacaulay, Vol. I. Chap. IV. Allen was not a believer in the Christian religion, and on this subject gave a tone to the conversation of Holland House.—Greville's Memoirs, Chap. XXX., Dec. 16, 1835. the friend of Lord Holland. Mr. Hallam, however, thought it was not by him, but by a Spaniard who is in England. I shall undoubtedly be able to let you know by my next letter. Mr. Ford, the writer of the Spanish articles in the Quarterly, has undertaken to review Prescott's book for that journal: whether his article will be ready for the next number I cannot tell. Prescott ought to be happy in his honorable fame. His publisher, Bentley, is about to publish a second edition in two volumes; an
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, March 1, 1839. (search)
I sat opposite Bulwer at dinner. It was at my friend Milnes's, where we had a small but very pleasant company,—Bulwer, Macaulay, Hare Francis George Hare, 1786-1842; eldest brother of Augustus and Julius Hare. (called Italian Hare), O'Brien, and Monteith. I sat next to Macaulay, and opposite Bulwer; and I must confess that it was a relief from the incessant ringing of Macaulay's voice to hear Bulwer's lisping, slender, and effeminate tones. I liked Bulwer better than I wished. He talked Macaulay's voice to hear Bulwer's lisping, slender, and effeminate tones. I liked Bulwer better than I wished. He talked with sense and correctness, though without brilliancy or force. His wife is on the point of publishing a novel, called Cheveley; or, The Man of Honor, in which are made revelations with regard to her quarrels with her husband. She goes to the theat and admire him very much. I know few people whose favorable judgment is more to be valued than his. I have spoken with Macaulay about an American edition of his works. He has received no communication from any publisher on the subject, and seemed
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
ith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character ever published, Ante,Vol. II. p. 47. entirely beating Macaulay's or Dr. Channing's. Parkes wishes me to take to Emerson the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has a collection of upwards of one hundred works about Milton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
ith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attainments. Parkes insists that on my return to London I shall stay with him in his house in Great George Street. He was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character ever published, Ante,Vol. II. p. 47. entirely beating Macaulay's or Dr. Channing's. Parkes wishes me to take to Emerson the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has a collection of upwards of one hundred works about Milton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
nd that by a semi-treacherous stab from that rhetorician, Macaulay. The Examiner—Fonblanque's of Feb. 28, I think—contains an admirable refutation of Macaulay's speech. Poor Talfourd will be enraged. It is the bill he has nursed through successhat will absorb his soul. I shall send him my sympathy. Macaulay seems a thorough failure; the sky-rocket come down a stic. Milnes, in a letter received yesterday, calls him Poor Macaulay, and says it is a matter of great regret to the Governmenre was, at this time, among scholars much impatience with Macaulay, which was afterwards essentially modified. Talfourd prong sixty years from the author's death.This motion (which Macaulay opposed) failing, the next year Lord Mahon renewed Talfouing, however, twenty-five years for sixty; and was met by Macaulay with another scheme, which prevailed in substance,—addinghom I never conversed with any pleasure. I am vexed with Macaulay for his abandonment of the rights of literary men. His ar<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
l suffrage, brought on by Duncombe presenting the petition of the Chartists. Lord John's speech is very good. Mark how gently he alludes to the United States. Macaulay's speech, though not wanting in force, fails in tact and address. I wonder there was not a laugh at his allusion to distress experienced under pecuniary difficulties. Speech on the People's charter, May 3, 1842; Macaulay's Speeches, Vol. I. 310-319. Duncombe must have started at it. Good-by. Ever and ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Longfellow he wrote, June 6, 1842:— It is artillery election-day, and the streets are full of happy throngs, and the Common is blackened by theh policy. Still, I have great faith that if in office he would, in spite of his Jeffersonian breeding and his prejudices, gravitate to the right. I have read Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome with great delight. Good-by! Ever, ever yours, C. S. To Longfellow, he wrote, in December, 1842:— Send, if you have not alread
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