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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 5 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 5 3 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Macbeth or search for Macbeth in all documents.

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ndefinitely. He rallied his boys, made a speech to them, and upon their return to the field nearly monopolized the fighting. Twenty-five men of the First Kentucky were killed and wounded. Among the number are Captain G. W. Drye, wounded; Lieutenant Phil. Roberts, wounded; Captain Kelly, killed; Lieutenant Cann, missing; Lieutenant Peyton, missing. Of the Forty-fifth Ohio, ninety-one were killed, wounded, and missing, among whom are Captain Jennings, wounded; Captain Ayler, wounded; Lieutenant Macbeth, wounded; Lieutenant Wiltshire, wounded; Lieutenant Mears, wounded. The conduct of the rebels was barbarous in the extreme. All prisoners, dead, and wounded were stripped. Four dead bodies of the Forty-fifth were found quite naked. One wounded officer, while unconscious, was aroused by efforts to cut off his finger, to obtain a gold ring. He was stripped to his shirt and drawers. Such is the venomous malignity of these desperadoes, who term themselves Southern chivalry, that bo