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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 25 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 22 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 20 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 9 1 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Mack or search for Mack in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
ed in reality. This was the case with the Duke of Orleans and Marsin, at the famous battle of Turin, then with the Duke of Burgundy and Vendome, at the battle of Oudenard. I believe even that it was so at Ulm, between the Arch-Duke Ferdinand and Mack. This last mode is deplorable, for then, in fact, no person is responsible. Every one knows that at Turin, the Duke of Orleans judged with more sagacity than Marshal Marsin, and the exhibition of full secret powers from the king was necessary, to cause the battle to be lost against the advice of the prince who commanded. In the same manner at Ulm, the Arch-Duke Ferdinand displayed more courage and skill than Mack, who was to serve him as mentor. If the prince have the genius and experience of an Arch-Duke Charles, he should be given the command with carte-blanche, and with the choice of his instruments. If he have not yet required the same titles, he may be sur rounded like Blucher, with an instructed chief of staff, and with a
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
ation of the troops of the two parties; for example, Mack, being found concentrated in 1805, near Ulm, and awaNapoleon made by Donauwerth and Augsburg, to cut off Mack from his line of retreat; this corps increased to fi of Prussia and of Austria, as well as their chiefs: Mack, among others, to whom the successes of the Prince orected, by Clairfayt, Charteler and Schmidt, than by Mack and the Prince of Coburg, proved that they had some those which he made in 1805 by Donauwert, to cut off Mack, and 1806 by Gera, to turn the Prussians; the march rmy of Napoleon, half'united around Ulm, to blockade Mack therein, might have need of biscuit until the surrencall the one which Napoleon made in 1805, to cut off Mack from Ulm; if it were facilitated by the hundred roadadmitted also that, by favor of those hundred roads, Mack would equally have been able to make his retreat mor Bavaria, with thirty thousand Russians; the army of Mack with which he was to unite, is entirely destroyed, w
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 5: of different mixed operations, which participate at the same time of strategy and.of tactics. (search)
to Genoa; Napoleon preferred to pass the Ticino, to enter Milan, to unite there with Moncey, who came with twenty thousand men by the St. Gothard, then to pass the Po at Placentia, persuaded that he would more surely precede Melas upon that point, than if he changed direction too soon upon his line of retreat. The passage of the Danube at Donanwerth and Ingolstadt, in 1805, was an operation nearly of the same kind; the direction chosen became the first cause of the destruction of the army of Mack. The suitable point in strategy is easily determined, after what we have said in Article 19, and it is not.useless to recollect that in a passage of a river, as in every other operation, there are permanent or geographical decisive points, and others which are relative or eventual, since they result from the situation of the hostile forces. If the point chosen unite strategic advantages to the tactical convenience of localities, this choice will leave nothing to be desired; but if it pr
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
course which it was necessary to take. Irresolution must be the accompaniment of minds which doubt everything. Returning to our subject I must confess that espionage has been singularly neglected in many modern armies, and in 1813 among others the staff of the Prince of Schwartzenburg not having a sou at its disposition for this service, the Emperor Alexander had to furnish funds from his chest to give to that staff the means of sending agents into Lusace to learn where Napoleon was. General Mack at Ulm and the Duke of Brunswick in 1806 were no better informed; and the French generals in Spain often paid dear for the impossibility of having spies and information upon what was passing around them. For information which can be obtained from flying corps, the Russian army is better off than any other, thanks to its Cossacks and the intelligence of its partizans. The expedition of the Prince Koudacheff, sent after the battle of Dresden to the Prince of Sweden, and who after havi