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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 37 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley. You can also browse the collection for William Mackinnon or search for William Mackinnon in all documents.

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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
nt, Mr. Mackay, the Missionary, the Antislavery Society, and Sir John Kirk, imploring assistance before he should be overwhelmed. Through the influence of Sir William Mackinnon, a relief-fund was collected in this country, Egypt promised an equal sum, and the Emin Relief Expedition was the consequence. When men hear a person cryile will, scientific attainments — and his name was Emin. The picture became impressed on our imaginations. The MacKINNONinnon clan, as we fondly termed Sir William Mackinnon and his personal friends, were among the foremost to come forward. They offered to give ten thousand pounds if the Egyptian Government would advance a simthes, and other very necessary articles, besides a judicious supply of good wine, which cheered us greatly. A little later, we met a large caravan sent by Sir William Mackinnon, freighted with provisions and clothes for our people. On the morning of the 4th December, 1889, Emin Pasha, Captain Casati, and myself were escorted by
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
but, thank Goodness! by the middle of April, the book was out of my hands, and I was alive and free. From Cairo, I proceeded to Cannes, to consult with Sir William Mackinnon about East Africa, and explain about German aggressiveness in that region. Thence I moved to Paris; and, not many days later, I was in Brussels, where I we weakness of the Liberal Government of the day, who were actually bluffed into cancelling the Treaty by German pressure. with all powers of jurisdiction. Sir William Mackinnon and myself were the signatories duly empowered. See In Darkest Africa, vol. II. In my opinion, the advantages of this Treaty were on the side of the Brroject of a railway to Uganda, for the suppression of the slave-trade, if I can arrange that Crophi and Mophi shall be substituted in place of Gordon Bennett and Mackinnon? Oh, that will not do; that is flat bribery and corruption ; and, smiling, he rose to his feet, buttoning his coat lest his virtue might yield to the temptat
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
from among his own friends, for no friend of Mackinnon could possibly resist a request from him. commercial, and, left alone by politicians, Mackinnon was the man to make it remunerative. But afa and the sea; but it soon became evident to Mackinnon, who was always so hopeful and cheerful, thaany, bankruptcy could not be far off. Though Mackinnon, through patriotism, held on much longer thaut them, he would not have been just my dear Mackinnon, whose presence, somehow, was always a joy tyleshire, to attend the funeral of my friend Mackinnon. Arrived Wednesday. We walked from his houd. Bruce was more of my own age than either Mackinnon, or Parke, and it is perhaps owing in a measongenial, or more in harmony with my own. Mackinnon belonged to an older generation, and was thes originally of a stronger fibre than either Mackinnon or Parke, i. e., from the common-sense points, yet here I am! and Bruce, and Parke, and Mackinnon, are gone; I write this to-day as sound, app[5 more...]
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
280; death of, 280; feelings of Stanley at news of his death, 295, 296; letters of, to Sir George Grey, 435. Llys, the, 40. Loafers, thoughts on, 530. Long Hart, 72. Low, Sidney, his article on Stanley's African explorations, 392-404; poem of, on Stanley, 539. Lowell, J. R., Letters of, 458, 459, 461. Lualaba, the, 318-330. See Congo. Lyall, Sir, Alfred, Stanley presides at lecture of, 501. Lyons, Colonel, 168. Machiavelli, 463, 464. Mackay, A. M., 406. Mackinnon, Sir, William, patronises the Emin Relief Expedition, 354; and the East African Company, 446-449; death and funeral of, 446, 449; remarks on, 459, 460. Malone, Tom, 169, 180. Mason, Penny, 165, 169. Manyanga, 335. Marks, Mr., 489, 494. Matabele War, 454, 455. McKenna, Mr., 478. Melchet Court, 423, 428. Milligan, Colonel James A., 205. Milner, Sir, Alfred, on South Africa, 495. Milton, John, 526. Mind and soul, thoughts on, 521, 522. Mirambo, 257, 258. Mississippi Rive