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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 22 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 16 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 7 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 5 3 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 3 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 3 1 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 3 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 2 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for James Mackintosh or search for James Mackintosh in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
I like very much, more than that of Colburn or Longman. It will appear at Christmas (an edition of five hundred copies) in very good style. . . . On the publication of the English edition I will send a copy to Mr. Empson, the successor of Sir James Mackintosh as Professor of Law, whom I know, and who writes the juridical articles in the Edinburgh, asking his acceptance of it, and stating that it is a work in which I have great confidence, and that I should be well pleased to see it reviewed in onversing with for three hours or more!—Basil Montagu; one of the sweetest men, with honeyed discourse, that I ever met. His mind is running over with beautiful images and with boundless illustration and allusion. He has known as bosom friends Mackintosh, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Lord Eldon; and he pours out his heart, as I freely mention their names, like water. He has just published a charming little book, entitled, Essays and Selections; and he has given me a copy, in which he has written
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
nd when he threw down the pen he had been using, the thought crossed my mind to appropriate it, and make my fortune by selling it to some of his absurd admirers in America. But I let the goose-quill sleep. What a different person I have just been conversing with for three hours or more!—Basil Montagu; one of the sweetest men, with honeyed discourse, that I ever met. His mind is running over with beautiful images and with boundless illustration and allusion. He has known as bosom friends Mackintosh, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Lord Eldon; and he pours out his heart, as I freely mention their names, like water. He has just published a charming little book, entitled, Essays and Selections; and he has given me a copy, in which he has written my name, with the affectionate good wishes of Basil Montagu. I have been amused at what was told me to-night with regard to my admission to the Athenaeum. I am an Honorary Member, admitted as a foreigner of distinction, a title which it made me sh
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
is the daughter of my friend, Mrs. Basil Montagu, and has munch of her mother's information and intelligence. There is no place that I enjoy more than Basil Montagu's. He is simple in his habits, never dines out, or gives dinners. I step into his house, perhaps, after I have been dining out, at ten or eleven o'clock in the evening; and we talk till I am obliged to say good morning, and not good night. The Montagus have been intimate with more good and great people than anybody I know. Mackintosh, Coleridge, Parr, Wordsworth, Lamb, were all familiar at their fireside. Mr. Montagu is often pronounced a bore, because he perpetually quotes Bacon and the ancient English authors. But it is a pleasure to me to hear some of those noble sentences come almost mended from his beautiful flowing enunciation. Mrs. M. is one of the most remarkable women I have ever known. Dr. Parr always called Mr. Montagu by his Christian name, Basil; and his wife, Basilissa; and their son, who was no favo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
is the daughter of my friend, Mrs. Basil Montagu, and has munch of her mother's information and intelligence. There is no place that I enjoy more than Basil Montagu's. He is simple in his habits, never dines out, or gives dinners. I step into his house, perhaps, after I have been dining out, at ten or eleven o'clock in the evening; and we talk till I am obliged to say good morning, and not good night. The Montagus have been intimate with more good and great people than anybody I know. Mackintosh, Coleridge, Parr, Wordsworth, Lamb, were all familiar at their fireside. Mr. Montagu is often pronounced a bore, because he perpetually quotes Bacon and the ancient English authors. But it is a pleasure to me to hear some of those noble sentences come almost mended from his beautiful flowing enunciation. Mrs. M. is one of the most remarkable women I have ever known. Dr. Parr always called Mr. Montagu by his Christian name, Basil; and his wife, Basilissa; and their son, who was no favo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
S. Cushing's Pamphlet on a Parliamentary Controversy in Massachusetts; December, 1843; Vol. VI. pp. 377, 378. Sir James Mackintosh's Discourse on the Law of Nature and Nations; December, 1843; Vol. VI. p. 380. and The University of Heidelber pride of the nobles have been checked by the spirit of a free people speaking through its representatives. Of Sir James Mackintosh's discourse he wrote:— It is unsurpassed by any juridical production for its learning, elegance, and elevatecarefully expressed. Since I saw you, I have refreshed my recollection of those three pictures, by Hume, Gibbon, and Mackintosh, of the capture of Jerusalem, the slaughter, and the homage afterwards to the Holy Sepulchre,—showing the blended devotn's philosophical reflections unsound, though his picture is martial and stirring. Hume is exquisite and graceful; but Mackintosh has the higher tone of philosophy and superior correctness of thought,—though these cannot make one forget the inferior<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
ver, my intention to discuss the matter at all with you; I am too old to desire, or even to indulge in, controversy. No one who knows you can doubt the entire sincerity with which you have spoken. All that I desire to claim is as sincere a conviction that, in the extent to which you seem to press your doctrines, they are not in my judgment defensible. In many parts of your discourse I have been struck with the strong resemblances which it bears to the manly, moral enthusiasm of Sir James Mackintosh; but I think that he would have differed from you in respect to war, and would have maintained a moderation of views, belonging at once to his philosophy and his life. I have spoken in all frankness to you, because I know that you will understand your friends too well to wish them to suppress their own opinions; but be assured that no one cherishes with more fond and affectionate pride the continual advancement of your professional and literary fame than myself, and no one has a