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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 22 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 16 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 7 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 5 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 3 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 3 1 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 3 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for James Mackintosh or search for James Mackintosh in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 7 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
hat in the spring of 1815 he was employed in writing an article for the Quarterly Review upon the life and achievements of Lord Wellington. He wrote in haste the remarkable paper which has since been published more than once, and the number of the Review containing it was urged through the press, so as to influence public opinion as much as possible, and to encourage the hearts of men throughout the country for the great contest. At the same time a number of the Edinburgh was due. Sir James Mackintosh had written an able and elaborate article, to show that the war ought to have been avoided, and that its consequences to England could only be unfortunate and inglorious. The number was actually printed, stitched, and ready for distribution; but it was thought better to wait a little for fear of accidents, and especially for the purpose of using it instantly after the first reverse should occur, and to give it the force of prophecy. The battle of Waterloo came like a thunder-clap.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
en here two years for her health, and is certainly one of the sweetest of women, with two children who are mere little cherubs, to whom she devotes herself with uncommon tenderness and affection. Twice in the week, generally, . . . . she collects a few of her friends, and by the variety of her talents and the sweetness of her manner gives a charm to her societies which none others in Rome have. Besides these, I used to go to Sir Thomas Trowbridge's; sometimes to Mrs. Drew's, sister of Lady Mackintosh; to John Bell's, the famous surgeon; etc., etc. I have reserved the Bonapartes to the last, because I really do not know where to class them; for they belong, now at least, to no nation, and live at home as among strangers. Their acquaintance, however, is more sought than that of any persons in Rome; and as for myself, I found no societies so pleasant, though I found others more cultivated and more fashionable. To begin, then, with Mad. Mere, as she is still called. She lives i
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
sly. But the first house at which I dined in England was Lord Holland's, where I met Tierney, Mackintosh, and some other of the leading Whigs, to whom I told it amidst great laughter. Two or three times afterwards, when I met Sir James Mackintosh, he spoke of Talleyrand, and always called him le petit moyen. Journal. On the 18th of January, 1819, I came to London [from Ramsgate], by the war in Europe. Lord Holland himself is a good scholar, and a pleasant man in conversation; Sir James Mackintosh was staying in his house, Sydney Smith and Brougham came there very often, and Heber and ink there was more mildness in his physiognomy than I can find in Mr. Fox's portraits. Sir James Mackintosh is a little too precise, a little too much made up in his manners and conversation, but ing, and, finally, warm, sincere feelings, and an earnest desire to serve those he likes. Sir James Mackintosh said of him to me, that, considering the extent of his knowledge, he had never known anyb
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
of anybody there. An interesting autobiography of Mrs. Fletcher, with selections from her letters, etc., has been published by her family. I have heard Sir James Mackintosh and Brougham speak of it with enthusiasm, and regret that she does not live in London, where they might hear her every day. She is, indeed, an extraordinarount the days before I shall embark, and shall soon count the hours. Farewell. Geo. Journal. While I was in London this time, I saw a good deal of Sir James Mackintosh, who spent a part of the winter at Lord Holland's, the house I most frequented. In consequence of this, Sir James was kind enough to invite me to visit hi more so at home, I suspect, than anywhere else. It was a small party in honor of the wedding of Sismondi, who had, a few days earlier, married a sister of Lady Mackintosh, Miss Allen, a cultivated lady, who, with her two sisters, I had seen often at Rome, and whom I felt that I already knew pretty well. Sismondi, too, I had kn
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
. He made conversation a fair exchange, and if his guest had anything to say, he was sure to have an opportunity. Miss Edgeworth wrote, in 1835, After a visit made by Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor at Edgeworthtown. to a friend of Mr. Ticknor, thus:— I have been acquainted, and I may say intimately, with some of the most distinguished literary persons in Great Britain, France, and Switzerland, and have seen and heard all those distinguished for conversational talents; Talleyrand, Dumont, Mackintosh, Romilly, Dugald Stewart, Erskine, Sir Walter Scott, Sydney Smith, and Mr. Sharpe, the fashionable dinner-lions of London. I have passed days in the country-houses and in the domestic intimacy of some of them, and after all, I can, with strict truth, assure you, that Mr. Ticknor's conversation appeared to me fully on an equality with the most admired, in happy, apposite readiness of recollection and application of knowledge, in stores of anecdote, and in ease in producing them, and in dep
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
character and tone assumed by the priests, who have every day, as they assure me, more and more the air of claiming superiority; especially where, as in the case of Edgeworthtown, the old priests have been removed, and Jesuits placed in their stead. After lunch,—there is only one service in the church,—Miss Edgeworth showed me a good many curious letters from Dumont,— one in particular, giving an account of Madame de Stael's visit, in 1813, to Lord Lansdowne at Bowood, for a week, when Mackintosh, Romilly, Schlegel, Rogers, and a quantity more of distinguished people were there; but Miss Edgeworth declined, not feeling apparently willing to live in a state of continual exhibition for so long a time. It was, however, very brilliant, and was most brilliantly described by Dumont. One thing amused me very much. Madame de Stael, who had just been reading the Tales of Fashionable Life,—then recently published,—with great admiration, said to Dumont of Miss Edgeworth: Vraiment elle
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
415. Guadiana River, 222 and note, 242. Guaiaqui, Count, 217, 218. Guilford, Lord, 175. Guizot, Francois, 256, 314. H Haase, 482. Haileybury. See Mackintosh. Hale, Nathan, 12. Hallam, Henry, 58. Halle, visits, 110. Hamilton, Alexander, Talleyrand's opinion of, 261; Washington's letter to, 261 note. Hamilt Mrs., Theodore, 10. Lynch, John, 389 note. Lyndhurst, Lord, Chancellor, 443. M Macbeth, Henderson's reading of, 55, 56. Mackenzie, Henry, 279. Mackintosh, Lady, 290. Mackintosh, Sir, James, 50, 263, 264, 265, 279, 289, 290, 291, 430. McLane, Louis, 409. McLane, Miss, 277, 278. McNeill, Mr., 417. McNeill, Mrs., Mackintosh, Sir, James, 50, 263, 264, 265, 279, 289, 290, 291, 430. McLane, Louis, 409. McLane, Miss, 277, 278. McNeill, Mr., 417. McNeill, Mrs., 417. Madison. J., President of the United States, 29, 30, 34, 53, 110, 346, 347, 409. Madison, Mrs., 29, 30, 346, 347. Madraso, Jose de, 186 and note. Madrid, visits, 185, 186-220; described, 190– 214. Malaga, 233, 234. Malaga, Bishop, 234, 235. Malibran, Madame, 407, 413. Maltby, Mr., 58, 413. Malthus, T. R., 290