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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
n habitation. Mr. Ticknor dined with President Madison soon after his arrival in Washington. Ietary was not on hand, and introduced me to Mrs. Madison, and Mrs. Madison introduced me to Miss ColMrs. Madison introduced me to Miss Coles, her niece. This is the only introduction, I am told, that is given on these occasions. The comence, or very few words. The President and Mrs. Madison made one or two commonplace remarks to me a moments a servant came in and whispered to Mr. Madison, who went out, followed by his Secretary. ll. Just at dark, dinner was announced. Mr. Madison took in Miss Coles, General Winder followedvoided it, and entered with him, the last. Mrs. Madison was of course at the head of the table; but I desired. So I had another tete-à--tete with Mr. and Mrs. Madison, in the course of which Mr. M.Mrs. Madison, in the course of which Mr. M. gave amusing stories of early religious persecutions in Virginia, and Mrs. M. entered into a defencon entered; and if I was astonished to find Mr. Madison short and somewhat awkward, I was doubly as[3 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
ir, as Boswell tells us Johnson did. His conversation was fluent and various,—full of declamation and sounding phrases like his writings,—and as dictatorial as an emperor's. He chose those subjects which he thought would be most interesting to me; and, though he often mistook in this, he never failed to be amusing. On American politics, he was bold and decisive. He thought we had ample cause for war, and seemed to have a very favorable opinion of our principal men, such as Jefferson and Madison, and our late measures, such as Monroe's conscription plan, and the subject of taking Canada,—though it was evident enough that he knew little about any of them. Thirty years ago, said he in a solemn tone, which would have been worthy of Johnson,—thirty years ago, sir, I turned on my heel when I heard you called rebels, and I was always glad that you beat us. He made some inquiries on the subject of our learning and universities, of which he was profoundly ignorant, and spoke of the stat
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
lish diplomacy, and came here directly from Munich, a year since, where he has been minister nearly two years. . . . . In his manners he is more American and democratic than English, and even in his dress there was a kind of popular carelessness which does not belong to his nation. He talks, too, without apparent reserve on subjects private and political, said a great deal of his mission to America, pronounced Jefferson to be a man of great talents and acuteness, but did not think much of Madison, spoke well of many democrats whom he thought honest, able men, etc., etc., and in general seemed to understand the situation of the politics and parties of the United States pretty well, though his mission lasted only five months, and he was hardly out of Washington . . . . . Among other things, we talked of Lord Byron; and he mentioned to me a circumstance which proves what I have always believed,—that Lord Byron's personal deformity was one great cause of his melancholy and misanthropy.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
rwards, accompanied by Mr. Webster, visited Mr. Madison at Montpellier, and Mr. Jefferson at Montic. . . . . On Saturday morning we reached Mr. Madison's, at Montpellier, on the west side of what a good deal of dignity and much cordiality, by Mr. and Mrs. Madison, in the portico, and immediateMrs. Madison, in the portico, and immediately placed at ease; for they were apprised of our coming an hour or two before we arrived, and were to show a little of that ceremony in which Mrs. Madison still delights. Mr. Madison is a youngerMr. Madison is a younger-looking man—he is now seventy-four— than he was when I saw him ten years ago, with an unsuccessfulnished with everything we wanted, and where Mrs. Madison sent us a nice supper every night and a nichree we rode, walked, or remained in our rooms, Mr. and Mrs. Madison being then occupied. The tablMrs. Madison being then occupied. The table is very ample and elegant, and somewhat luxurious; it is evidently a serious item in the account oations, to see the country and the people. Mr. Madison's farm—as he calls it—consists of about th
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
etrating glance, which showed him to be always ready and vigilant. After dinner, when we were in the long library, he took me away from the rest of the party, and asked me a great many questions about the practical operation of the ballot in the United States, and gave his opinion very freely on the relations of the two countries. He said that as we get along further from the period of our Revolution and the feelings that accompanied it, we get along easier together; that Jefferson and Madison disliked England so much that they took every opportunity to make difficulty; that Monroe was a more quiet sort of person, but that J. Q. Adams hated England; and that they much preferred the present administration, which seemed sincerely disposed to have all things easy and right. He asked if Van Buren was likely to be the next President. I told him I thought he would be. He said he was a pleasant and agreeable man, but he did not think him so able as Mr. McLane, who preceded him. As
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
cbeth, Henderson's reading of, 55, 56. Mackenzie, Henry, 279. Mackintosh, Lady, 290. Mackintosh, Sir, James, 50, 263, 264, 265, 279, 289, 290, 291, 430. McLane, Louis, 409. McLane, Miss, 277, 278. McNeill, Mr., 417. McNeill, Mrs., 417. Madison. J., President of the United States, 29, 30, 34, 53, 110, 346, 347, 409. Madison, Mrs., 29, 30, 346, 347. Madraso, Jose de, 186 and note. Madrid, visits, 185, 186-220; described, 190– 214. Malaga, 233, 234. Malaga, Bishop, 234, 235.Madison, Mrs., 29, 30, 346, 347. Madraso, Jose de, 186 and note. Madrid, visits, 185, 186-220; described, 190– 214. Malaga, 233, 234. Malaga, Bishop, 234, 235. Malibran, Madame, 407, 413. Maltby, Mr., 58, 413. Malthus, T. R., 290. Manning, Mr., 61. Marchetti, Count and Countess, 166. Mareuil, Baron de, 350. Marialva, Marques de, 180, 246, 263. Marina, Fr. M., 197. Marron, P. H. . 130. Mars, Mlle., 126. Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States, 33, 38. Martens, Professor, 77. Martinetti, Count and Countess, 166, 167. Mason, James M., death of, 456. Mason, Jeremiah, 123 and note, 395, 396. Mason, William Powell, 12, 31