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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for L. B. Madison or search for L. B. Madison in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
Mississippi; Chaplain E. A. Garrison, 48th Mississippi; Lieutenant Robert T. Knox, 30th Virginia; Lieutenant J. H. Marshall, 30th Virginia; Captain J. S. Knox, 30th Virginia; Lieutenant St. George Fitzhugh, Pegram Artillery; Lieutenant T. L. Roberts, 34th Virginia; Lieutenant J. S. Watts, 46th Virginia; Lieutenant J. T. Fowler, 46th Virginia; Major M. B. Hardin, 18th Virginia Battalion; Adjutant W. H. Laughter, 18th Virginia Battalion; Captain W. S. Griffin, 18th Virginia Battalion; Captain L. B. Madison, 58th Virginia; Lieutenant Judson Hundron, Lieutenant J. Foyler, 58th Virginia; Lieutenant John Addison, 17th Virginia; Lieutenant-Colonel G. Tyler, 17th Virginia; Lieutenant J. B. Hill, 53d Virginia; Sergeant-Major J. S. Miller, 20th Virginia Battalion; Lieutenant M. H. Daughty, 11th Florida; Captain Winder, Young's Battery; Lieutenant J. C. Murray, Young's Battery; Captain W. S. Randall, General Custis Lee's staff; Colonel J. T. Crawford, 51st Georgia; Colonel James Dickey. 51st Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
o speak, in which his brain and energies are to be stimulated to the highest degree. But history gives little warrant for such an assumption. The great men of this country certainly were nearly all of them country bred. Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Calhoun, Patrick Henry, John Marshall, George Mason, John Randolph, Henry Clay, Henry A. Wise, Abel P. Upshur, William C. Rives, Silas Wright, Thomas H. Benton, Andrew Jackson, Francis P. Blair, Abraham Lincoln, William J. Bryan, and maof this list of very able men, not one was superior in general, all-'round ability to Mr. Hunter; not one was his equal in legislative force and influence; not one was so universally confided in and trusted. Since the passing away of Jefferson, Madison, Marshall and Monroe, hardly any Virginian has borne so influential a part in political affairs as R. M. T. Hunter, and certainly no Virginian has done so in the Federal Congress, though the Commonwealth has had many sons who were wise and eloq