hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 87 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 77 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 57 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 26 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. You can also browse the collection for John Bankhead Magruder or search for John Bankhead Magruder in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 3: in Mexico. (search)
l. It was in this assault that Captain John Bankhead Magruder, commanding a light field-battery,d, and the enemy retired nearer the city. To Magruder's battery was assigned an important post in f battery; which he so handled, as to win from Magruder, the following commendation in his report:--ISeptember 13th. Major-General Pillow, to whom Magruder's battery was assigned, was directed to attaccircuit beyond Pillow, and assail the north. Magruder was ordered by his general to divide his battxican batteries. When the detachment, which Magruder supported with the section under his immediatby the rapid and unerring fire of Jackson and Magruder. By this time the storming parties had piand the 14th under Colonel Tronsdale, and Captain Magruder's field-battery, 1st Artillery (one sectined his guns upon his retreating forces. Captain Magruder's battery, one section of which was servesingular coincidence, that this report of Captain Magruder was addressed immediately to one who has [4 more...]
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 9: General view of the campaigns of 1862. (search)
oke Island. On the eastern borders of Virginia, they occupied Fortress Monroe, and Newport News, all the lower peninsula between the James and York Rivers, and the mouth of the Rappahannock. Near the ancient towns of Williamsburg and York, General Magruder, with a few thousand men, held their superior numbers at bay: and his guns maintained a precarious command over the channels of the two rivers. Around Washington, swarmed the Grand Army of General McClellan, upon both banks of the Potomac; the right wing resting on the Potomac at Evansport, and to surround and crush General Johnston at Manassas, or else to force him toward Richmond, and pursue him. The army on the Peninsula, setting out from Fortress Monroe, was to press back General Magruder, and assail the capital from the East. The forces in the Valley, having beaten General Jackson, were either to converge towards the rear of Manassa's Junction, by crossing the Blue Ridge, or else to march southwestward up that District, and
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 11: McDowell. (search)
Chapter 11: McDowell. From April 1st to April 17th, General Jackson occupied the position already described, upon Reede's Hill. Meantime, the grand armies of the Potomac had wholly changed their theatre of war. April 1st, General McClellan appeared at Fortress Monroe, on the eastern extremity of the peninsula between the James and York Rivers, and began to direct the approaches of his mighty host against Richmond from that point. On the 4th, he appeared before the lines of General Magruder, at Young's Mill, while at the same date, the troops of General Johnston were pouring through Richmond, from their lines behind the Rappahannock, to reinforce their brethren defending the peninsula. General Jackson's prospect of a junction with the main army in Culpepper were, therefore, at an end; and his movements were thus rendered, for a time, more independent of the other Confederate forces. The correctness of his reasonings upon the probable movements of the Federalists was now verifie
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 14: the Richmond campaign. (search)
es, with a portion of the cavalry, while Generals Magruder and Huger guarded his front, and stood pwhen a rapid outbreak of firing told that General Magruder had attacked the enemy near Savage's stat to precede the troops to the position of General Magruder, in order to have time for fuller confereshment, he now advanced through the troops of Magruder, and took the old highway which led to Williaad, and north of it. Major-Generals Huger and Magruder were directed to.press the enemy in front, byssigned the left to Jackson, and the right to Magruder, supported by Huger and Holmes. Longstreet awaited the signal to begin. But the corps of Magruder, moving after Jackson's and delayed by a miscld begin upon the right, with the brigades of Magruder, and that when D. H. Hill heard the cheer witH. Hill. The divisions under command of. General Magruder lost about two thousand nine hundred men,g simultaneous. Had the corps of Jackson and Magruder charged simultaneously, with the devoted gall[8 more...]