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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 87 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 77 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 57 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Bankhead Magruder or search for John Bankhead Magruder in all documents.

Your search returned 43 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
s, after the manner of Parrott. The army in observation at Harper's Ferry, and that at Manassas, were supplied with old batteries of six-pounder guns and twelve-pounder Howitzers. A few Parrott guns purchased by the State of Virginia were with Magruder at Big Bethel. For the ammunition and equipments required for the infantry and artillery a good laboratory and shops had been established at Richmond by the State, but none of the Southern arsenals were yet in a condition to do much work. Th for his big ten-inch Columbiads: Lovell, at New Orleans, for his extended defences, and especially for his inadequate artillery at Forts Jackson and St. Phillips; Polk, at Columbus, Kentucky; Johnston, for his numerous batteries on the Potomac; Magruder, at Yorktown. All these were deemed most important points. Then came Wilmington, Georgetown, Port Royal, and Fernandina. Not a few of these places sent representatives to press their claims—Mr. Yulee from Fernandina, and Colonel Gonzales from
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
ree-inch rifles, after drawings furnished at Montgomery; but the progress made was necessarily slow. The State of Virginia possessed a number of old four-pounder iron guns, which were reamed out to get a good bore, and were rifled with three grooves, after the manner of Parrott. The army in observation at Harper's Ferry, and that at Manassas, were supplied with old batteries of six-pounder guns and twelve-pounder Howitzers. A few Parrott guns purchased by the State of Virginia were with Magruder at Big Bethel. For the ammunition and equipments required for the infantry and artillery a good laboratory and shops had been established at Richmond by the State, but none of the Southern arsenals were yet in a condition to do much work. The arsenal at Augusta, Ga., was directed to organize for the preparation of ammunition and the making of knapsacks, of which there were none wherewith to equip the troops now daily taking the field. The arsenal at Charleston and the depot at Savannah
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
order, as I at first intended, but will note simply what I can recollect, paying some attention to the succession of events. The winter of 1861-1861 was the darkest period of my department. Powder was called for on every hand—Bragg, at Pensacola, for his big ten-inch Columbiads: Lovell, at New Orleans, for his extended defences, and especially for his inadequate artillery at Forts Jackson and St. Phillips; Polk, at Columbus, Kentucky; Johnston, for his numerous batteries on the Potomac; Magruder, at Yorktown. All these were deemed most important points. Then came Wilmington, Georgetown, Port Royal, and Fernandina. Not a few of these places sent representatives to press their claims—Mr. Yulee from Fernandina, and Colonel Gonzales from Charleston. Heavy guns, too, were called for in all directions—the largest guns for the smallest places. The abandonment of the line of the Potomac, and of the upper Mississippi from Columbus to Memphis; the evacuation of the works below Pensaco<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of General John Bankhead Magruder. (search)
Memoir of General John Bankhead Magruder. General A. L. Long. As far back as 1848 the name of C the army with admiration. There it was that Magruder learned the lessons in artillery that so wellbut the brilliant service of the batteries of Magruder, Bragg and Duncan during that war raised it t guns are unsurpassed for destructiveness. Magruder was not a tyrannical schoolmaster, but alloweimary batteries beyond the effective range of Magruder's guns (one and a half miles). At this timdirected to assume command of the Peninsula. Magruder, in his report, says that with twenty-five th made to the Peninsula campaign. After General Magruder had resigned the command of the Peninsulan with but slight alteration was adopted, and Magruder retained that position that had been previouse Station. And on the 31st, at Malvern Hill, Magruder assaulted, with splendid gallantry, the Feder that his ability was correctly estimated. Magruder continued in the command of the Department of[20 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sabine Pass. (search)
he fleet, surrendered to the gallant defenders of the fort. The loss of the enemy has been heavy, while not a man on our side has been killed or wounded. Though the enemy has been repulsed in his naval attacks, his land forces, reported as ten thousand strong, are still off the coast waiting an opportunity to land. The Major-General calls on every man able to bear arms to bring his guns or arms, no matter of what kind, and be prepared to make a sturdy resistance to the foe. Major-General J. B. Magruder. Edmund P. Turner, Assistant Adjutant-General. The Daily Post, of Houston, Texas, of August 22, 1880, has the following: A few days after the battle each man that participated in the fight was presented with a silver medal inscribed as follows: On one side D. G., for the Davis Guards, and on the reverse side, Sabine Pass, September 8, 1863. Captain Odlum and Lieutenant R. W. Dowling have gone to that bourne whence no traveler returns, and but few members of the heroic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A sketch of Debray's Twenty-Sixth regiment of Texas cavalry. (search)
into the city. By the close of November, Major-General John Bankhead Magruder came to assume the command of Texas, relievnteered to serve as his aid. At Virginia Point General Magruder was actively organizing his land forces. We had about fie bay, and on the 1st of January, 1863, at day-break, General Magruder pointed and fired the first gun. In less than two minisappointed at what they considered a failure; not so General Magruder, whose only object in attacking by land was to divertrange looking crafts boldly steaming down to them. General Magruder's success far exceeded public expectation, and for a Republics are ungrateful. Brave, generous, warm-hearted Magruder died at Houston in want and almost friendless. Much was a, of the engineer corps, having reported for duty to General Magruder, at Virginia Point, on the eve of the attack, was inses of that heartrending scene never can forget it. General Magruder's success raised popular enthusiasm to the highest pi