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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 87 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 77 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 57 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Bankhead Magruder or search for John Bankhead Magruder in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
0,000, from what I saw. Large numbers, as I ascertained afterward, were posted in the woods on our extreme right and left, and the line of ditches across the meadows were lined with sharp-shooters. What was the plan of battle? Let General J. Bankhead Magruder, the Confederate commander who directed the plan of battle, explain: Soon after, Mahone's brigade having arrived and the hour growing late, I gave the order that Wright's brigade, supported by Mahone's should advance and attack tte of the commencement of the attack, putting it certainly an hour too late, says: The same ominous silence which had preceded thee attack in force at Gaines' Mill now intervened, lasting until about six o'clock, at which time the enemy (General John B. Magruder's corps) opened upon us suddenly with the full force of his artillery, and at once began to push forward his columns of infantry to the attack of our positions. Regiment after regiment, and sometimes whole brigades, were thrown against
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9 (search)
t of the Federal army at Manassas. McClellan, unable to resist this clamor, determined to endeavor to reach the Confederate capital by way of the lower Chesapeake, and on transports transferred his army to the Peninsular and sat down before Yorktown. It is estimated that McClellan at this time had an army of not less than one hundred and twenty thousand men fit for duty. This force was to be confronted and delayed until Johnston could arrive by thirteen thousand Confederates under General J. B. Magruder, who, in order to accomplish this purpose, was compelled to cover a front of thirteen miles with his small force. The work was done, and with consummate ability, and it is no disparagement to others to say there was no officer in either army better qualified to play such a game of bluff than the genial, whole-souled Magruder. Ramseur was ordered to report with his battery at Yorktown. When he arrived Magruder, who had known him in the old army, detached him from his battery and p