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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 87 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 77 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 57 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Bankhead Magruder or search for John Bankhead Magruder in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
otive less noble than a sense of duty. From the day when Magruder describes him immured in the study of plans and maps in t in immediate command) and the Confederates under General John B. Magruder. Though comparatively a small affair, considereble host the Confederates had assembled, under General John Bankhead Magruder, about 1,400 men, consisting of the First Nortmpton. We had not a single man wounded or killed. Colonel Magruder came up that evening and assumed command. A fresh below, where I had placed a picket of some forty men, Colonel Magruder sent Captain Worth's company, of Montague's command, e action in our favor. In obedience to orders from Colonel Magruder, Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart marched back, and in spiteusion by a cool, deliberate, and well directed fire. Colonel Magruder sent over portions of Companies G, C and H, of my regt, with some one hundred dragoons, in compliance with Colonel Magruder's orders, pursued. The enemy, in his haste, threw aw
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. (search)
through the influence of this Virginian, then at the head of the United States army, that President Lincoln was induced to offer that high command to Colonel Lee. This tender so calculated to gratify an ordinary pride, and great enough to satisfy any ambition, came to a man who was controlled in every act of his existence by his desire to do the right. In all that memorable career there is not an act nor utterance which suggests a motive less noble than a sense of duty. From the day when Magruder describes him immured in the study of plans and maps in the halls of Montezuma, aloof from the gaities of a splendid capital, to that on which he answered adsum to the summons of the Great Captain of us all, the rigid rule by which his existence was ordered, never varied. His answer to the overture was a courteous negative, and forthwith he saw that the time had come to leave the service of the Union. That his resignation from the United States army was a step taken in sorrow and after
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
al Pierce in immediate command) and the Confederates under General John B. Magruder. Though comparatively a small affair, considered in the n formidable host the Confederates had assembled, under General John Bankhead Magruder, about 1,400 men, consisting of the First North Carolinn into Hampton. We had not a single man wounded or killed. Colonel Magruder came up that evening and assumed command. A fresh supply. f a mile below, where I had placed a picket of some forty men, Colonel Magruder sent Captain Worth's company, of Montague's command, with one ecided the action in our favor. In obedience to orders from Colonel Magruder, Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart marched back, and in spite of the pd the illusion by a cool, deliberate, and well directed fire. Colonel Magruder sent over portions of Companies G, C and H, of my regiment, ton Douthatt, with some one hundred dragoons, in compliance with Colonel Magruder's orders, pursued. The enemy, in his haste, threw away hundre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
enough of this. The fearful drama of 1862 is about to begin. In the early spring the Federal army, some 200,000 men, under Mc-Clellan, changed its base from the Potomac to the Peninsula at Yorktown, of historic memory. They were confronted by Magruder with some 10,000 or 15,000 troops, who held the vast horde of Federal troops at bay until the arrival of General Johnston, who rapidly marched from the line of the Rappahannock to reinforce Magruder. After confronting him for several days, our Magruder. After confronting him for several days, our army began its retreat toward Richmond—Hood's brigade, then belonging to Whiting's division, covering the retreat to Williamsburg, passing through that town, while the battle of Williamsburg was in progress. The division was moved rapidly to Eltham's Landing, on York river, in order to cover an anticipated movement calculated to intercept the retreat of the army. Here, for the first time in the campaign, the Texas troops engaged the enemy, in a densely wooded country along the York river. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
s around on their travel bars, inside the fort. Captain Odlum sent immediately to the town of Sabine for ammunition, and soon the little company of men set to work with great energy to prepare for the battle which they knew was imminent. General Magruder, who had been informed of the enemy's approach, sent word to Captain Odlum to spike the guns, blow up the fort, and retreat to Taylor's bayou, and there to try to hold the the enemy in check. When these orders were made known to Lieutenant. George H. Baily, who is living out in California, volunteered his services and was in the fort during the battle, but, as no one required his attention as a surgeon, he assisted in firing the guns, and valuable assistance he rendered, too. General Magruder presented him with a sword which was taken from one of the prisoners. Mr. Jefferson Davis in his book on the Rise and fall of the Confederacy, says: There is no parallel in ancient or modern warfare to that of Dowling and his men at Sabin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, 124; Surrender by. 177; peerless, 192; sublime in action, 191; did not offer his sword to Grant, 269, 309. Letcher, Governor, John, 364. Lewis, Dr Samuel E., 273. Lincoln, Assassination of, 46, 56; offered no terms, 177 call for troops in 1861, 253. Little General Henry, Burial of, 212. Lively. E. H., 177, 227. Lost Chapter, in C. S. History, The, 844. McCaleb, Hon. E. H., 3. McClellan, General G B., 102, 287. McDonald, Major E. H 163. McGuire, Dr Hunter, 99, 336. Magruder, General John B., 198. Manassas, Second Battle of, 305. Marietta, Ga., Burning of, 198. Marshall, Colonel, Charles, 172. Maryland Line, C. S. A 88; Monument to, 132; 247; Bazaar held by Ladies of, 132; supplied with arms by Virginia, 163; battery, 227. Massachusetts regiment, 6th, in Baltimore in 1861. 214. Meade, General George C, 162. Mechanicsville Battle of, 302. Miles, General N. A., Cruelty of, 51. Milroy, General R. H., Order of, 105. Monroe Doctrine The,