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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 123 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 117 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 101 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 58 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 16 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 3 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 39 5 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 28 12 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 19 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 18 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Magruder or search for Magruder in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
took positions in the several entrances of the arbor to prevent the exit or entrance of the enemy. We did not hold this place long. On January 1st, 1863, General Magruder attacked our vessels with three steamers, fitted with cotton-bale defences, and manned by sharpshooters. At 11.30 A. M., these steamers were discovered comiy's steamers were alongside the Harriet Lane. At the same time that he attacked the Capture of the U. S. Steamer Harriet Lane by the Confederates, under General Magruder, in Galveston harbor on the night of January 1st, 1863. Union fleet, General Magruder filled the streets of Galveston with a superior force of troops, caGeneral Magruder filled the streets of Galveston with a superior force of troops, captured all our soldiers and stationed heavy batteries of artillery at prominent points to prevent our other vessels (which were mostly aground at low tide) from escaping. It was a well conceived plan and carried out with great gallantry. The Westfield was at this moment hard and fast aground, and could not be moved. The Con
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
es, both my discretion and my authority, so far as the organization of the expedition was concerned, were at an end. The disposition of the enemy's forces at that time, according to the best information that could be obtained, was as follows: Magruder had about 20,000 men of all arms, of which 15,000 were serviceable. The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon td River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000, held the country from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, confronting Steele. Magruder could spare 10,000 of his force to resist an attack from the east, leaving his fortifications well garrisoned on the coast, while Price could furnish at least an additional 5,000 from the north, making a formidable army of from 25,000 to 30,000