hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 62 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 62 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 52 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 37 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 30 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John B. Magruder or search for John B. Magruder in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

and became a part of that wonderful campaign so long conducted with inadequate forces by Gen. John B. Magruder. High praise is due to this campaign, by which that eccentric officer, through marvelou open a prospect of fight. If a fiasco of Butler, it was also a disillusion of the battalion. Magruder coldly reports that the Louisiana regiment arrived after the battle was over, having made a mosrk, was proclaiming that the war would not last three months. The command had received from General Magruder, in consideration of their being the pioneer volunteers from their State, an assurance thatn between the showy uniforms of the lately-arrived Washington artillery and the ragged coats of Magruder's weary trampers. No matter—in a few months battle was to make them all of one color. The tenthe Louisiana regiments found their way from Richmond and its delights to the Peninsula. There Magruder and his foot-cavalry still kept the wretched roads free from the tread of foemen. Among the nu
rn Virginia fight at Blackburn's ford the fame of Harry Hays battle of First Manassas with Magruder on the Peninsula Williamsburg and Seven Pines Around the Confederate capital, as early as Jns and to complete scientific parallels. With all his army, he was afraid to attack in force. Magruder, with less than 8, 000 to oppose him, itched to fight, but had not enough men. In the few skirmishes on the Yorktown line the Louisianians with Magruder bore off their share of honors. On April 5th, when the enemy attacked the redoubts, his attempt to flank by crossing the Warwick river was fos other commands not mentioned in the reports. One day during these clamorous reports of war Magruder favored his men with a new march—somewhat longer than his wont on the peninsula. On April 21stth his entire army. He attacked the Confederate rear guard near Williamsburg. During the day, Magruder succeeded in keeping the swarming masses in check. Here the Fourteenth Louisiana, Colonel Jone
tates. During this first year of the war he was put in command of the district of Louisiana and especially of the defenses of New Orleans. For a short time he had command of the Trans-Mississippi department, which was turned over to him by General Magruder when the latter was placed in command of the department of Texas. Though he performed with great fidelity all the duties of the various commands to which he was assigned, he was not actively engaged except at Milliken's Bend, where he acquitted himself in such a manner as was to be expected from a man of his reputation and courage. During 1864 he was in command of the district of Texas and the Territory of Arizona. After the surrender of the armies of Lee and Johnston, Magruder transferred to Hebert the command of the department of Texas, and by him it was surrendered. After the war had ended General Hebert resumed business in his native State. He died on the 29th of August, 1880, at New Orleans Brigadier-General Edward Hig