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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 87 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 82 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 77 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 57 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for John Bankhead Magruder or search for John Bankhead Magruder in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Operations of 1861 about Fort Monroe. (search)
Abram Duryea; 7th N. Y., Col. John E. Bendix; 1st Vt. (5 co's), Lieut.-Col. Peter T. Washburn; Regular artillery (4 guns), Lieut. John T. Greble (k). Total Union loss: 18 killed, 53 wounded, and 5 missing = 76. Confederate Forces: Col. J. Bankhead Magruder. 1st N. C., Col. Daniel H. Hill; 3d Va. (detachment), Lieut.-Col. William D. Stuart; Va. Cavalry Battalion, Maj. E. B. Montague; Va. Howitzer Battalion, Ma;j. Geo. W. Randolph. Total Confederate loss: 1 killed and 7 wounded = 8. theo a position near Big Bethel, the troops under General Peirce found the Confederates occupying a strong position, well intrenched, with earth-works covering the bridge, which crossed a stream running in front of the Confederate position. Colonel J. B. Magruder, formerly an officer in the United States Army, was in command, having, it was said, about 1800 men under him, but having actually only 300 or 400 men and about 5 guns. Duryea's Zouaves moved up the road on the left of the woods, and t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
Johnston's rear-guard about noon, six miles from Williamsburg, and skirmished with the cavalry of Stuart, following sharply until 4 o'clock, when he was confronted by a line of redoubts before Williamsburg. The works consisted of a large fort (Magruder) at the junction of two roads running from Yorktown to Williamsburg, and small redoubts on each side of this, making an irregular chain of fortifications extending, with the creeks upon which they rested on either flank, across the peninsula. The Confederate brigades of The 61st New York regiment in camp at ship point, below Yorktown. [see map, P. 188.] from a War-time sketch. Kershaw and Semmes, of Magruder's command, occupied the works when Stoneman came in front of them, and, on finding his advance stubbornly opposed, Stoneman sent his cavalry upon reconnoissances over the field, and waited for the infantry under Hooker and Smith to come to his support. These divisions marched from Yorktown on parallel roads until Smith's
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Confederate use of subterranean shells on the Peninsula. (search)
an's report on buried torpedoes at Yorktown, reached General Johnston, who, in a letter dated May 12th, requested General D. H. Hill to ascertain if there was any truth in it. General Hill referred the matter to Rains, who on May 14th reported in part as follows: I commanded at Yorktown for the last seven months, and when General McClellan approached with his army of 100,000 men and opened his cannons upon us, I had but 2500 in garrison, and our whole Army of the Peninsula, under Major-General Magruder, amounted to but 9300 effective men; then at a salient angle, an accessible point of our works, as part of the defenses thereof, I had the land mined with the weapons alluded to, to destroy assailants and prevent escalade. Subsequently, with a similar view, they were placed at spots I never saw. . . . And again when, at Williamsburg, we were ordered to turn upon our assailants and combat them, . . . some 6 or 7 miles this side of Williamsburg, my command forming the rear-guard of the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
ril. Mr. Davis further says: At this time General Magruder occupied the lower Peninsula with his forof seven or eight thousand men [II., 84]. General Magruder reported that he had eleven thousand men. After the first advance of the enemy, General Magruder was reenforced by some troops from the son the same page: On the 9th of April, General Magruder's command, thus reinforced, amounted to aad about 8000 officers and men for duty. General Magruder's force was thus increased to about 20,00isions had together about 10,000 men, so that Magruder's army was raised to about 33,000 men, insteaf affairs there. After spending a day on General Magruder's defensive line, he returned to Richmondilable forces should be united near Richmond, Magruder's troops to be among the last to arrive; the ch was impossible. Mr. Davis says that General Magruder's Absence at this moment was the more to little farther down [II., 120]: Major-General John B. Magruder, C. S. A. From a photograph. I
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
y. The only troops within reach, not already up, were a brigade and a half of Magruder's command stationed along the New Bridge road. I sent General Johnston's ordeof Fair Oaks Station, uniting there with the division under Whiting; and says, Magruder's division in reserve was under arms near. Narrative of military operationswas a gap between Whiting's right and Longstreet's left, and I knew, too, that Magruder's troops were not concentrated at Old Tavern. Only one of the many remarkabr three brigades within close supporting distance. There were six brigades in Magruder's command. Two of them were guarding the Mechanicsville and Meadow Bridge roaneral Kershaw's right to New Bridge, and on the line down New Bridge road. Magruder's six brigades were the only forces guarding the crossings of the Chickahominyoad; this division remained on theNine-mile road, a mile or more in advance of Magruder's line at Old Tavern. The camps of Huger's division were on the banks of Gill
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
ig.-Gen. Roswell S. Ripley: 44th Ga., Col. Robert A. Smith (m w), Capt. John W. Beck; 48th Ga., Col. William Gibson; 1st N. C., Col. M. S. Stokes (k), Capt. H. A. Brown, Lieut.-Col. William P. Bynum; 3d N. C., Col. Gaston Meares (k), Lieut.-Col. William L. De Rosset. Brigade loss: k, 171; w, 707; m, 30==908. Artillery: Va. Battery (Hanover Arty.), Capt. (G. W. Nelson. (See, also, Jones's Battalion in Reserve Artillery, temporarily attached to this division.) Magruder's command, Maj.-Gen. J. B. Magruder. Jones's division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs: 2d Ga., Col. Edgar M. Butt (w), Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes; 15th Ga., Col. William M. Mcintosh (m w), Lieut.-Col. William T. Millican, Maj. T. J. Smith, Capt. S. Z. Hearnsberger; 17th Ga., Col. Henry L. Benning; 20th Ga., Col. J. B. Cumming. Brigade loss: k, 44; w, 380; m, 6 == 430. Third Brigade, Col. George T. Anderson: 1st Ga. (regulars), Col. William J. Magill; 7th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
the advantage of position wisely chosen by the Federals and skillfully arranged for defense. During Lee's absence Richmond was at the mercy of McClellan; but Magruder was there to keep up a clatter, as Swinton expresses it. No one ever lived who could play off the Grand Seignior with a more lordly air than could Prince John, as Magruder was called. In ante-bellum days (so the old army story used to run) Magruder was a lieutenant of artillery at Rouse's Point. There his mess entertained some British officers, two of whom were scions of nobility. The visit having been expected, the mess had borrowed or rented gold plate and silver plate, cut-glass wMagruder was a lieutenant of artillery at Rouse's Point. There his mess entertained some British officers, two of whom were scions of nobility. The visit having been expected, the mess had borrowed or rented gold plate and silver plate, cut-glass ware, rich furniture, and stylish equipages for conveying the noble guests. Prince John assured them that these were but the debris of the former splendor of the regimental mess. Only the debris, my lord; the schooner bringing most of the mess plate from Florida was wrecked. On the second day of the festival one of the dazzled n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
. M. Law says in the Southern bivouac for May, 1887: The battle of Savage's Station, although a drawn fight as far as the possession of the field was concerned, was practically a victory for the Federals. Though their loss was three times as great as that of the Confederates, they accomplished the main purpose of the battle, which was to gain time for the passage of trains, artillery, and troops across White Oak Swamp. The Confederate force engaged in this fight was commanded by General J. B. Magruder, and consisted of Semmes's and Kershaw's brigades, Kemper's battery, and two regiments of Barksdale's brigade opposite our left. Cobb's division and two guns of Hart's battery were north of the railroad to the right of our line. Cobb's infantry was not engaged. About a half-hour after the fight was ended, I suggested to General Sumner that if he had no objection I would carry out the commanding general's orders, so far as I was concerned, and cross the White Oak Swamp with Gener
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
s was to take possession of Malvern Hill, and Magruder to follow the line of retreat, as soon as theays ready for a fight, immediately attacked. Magruder, who followed them down the Darbytown road, wd for assistance, and, by Longstreet's order, Magruder was sent to him. After a weary march, MagrudeMagruder was recalled to aid Longstreet; but the day was spent in fruitless marching and countermarching, sson's whole corps and the divisions of Huger, Magruder, Holmes, McLaws, and my own were near by. halted at Willis's Church. The divisions of Magruder, Huger, and McLaws were still farther over toelled to fall back under cover of the woods. Magruder advanced at the same signal, having portions vance after sunset of the nine brigades under Magruder's orders. Toombs's brigade belonged to MagMagruder, but had moved to my assistance by my order when we were hard pressed. It was not, therefore,was 6500 strong, and that the loss was 2000. Magruder puts his force at between 26,000 and 28,000 ([2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
f a few shots that did no damage. Holmes got into position below me on the New Market road, and was afterward joined by Magruder, who had previously made an unsuccessful attack on the Federal rear-guard at Savage's Station. by 11 o'clock our troohe others escaped.--Editors. but for the succoring forces, which should have been engaged by Jackson, Huger, Holmes, and Magruder, Mc-call would have been entirely dislodged by the first attack. All of our other forces were within a radius of 3 mile for the battle of Frayser's farm, and after his batteries had misled me into opening the fight he subsided. Holmes and Magruder, who were on the New Market road to attack the Federals as they passed that way, failed to do so, General McClellan'saturely and left the rear of McClellan's Army exposed, which would have been fatal had Jackson come up and taken part in Magruder's affair of the 29th near Savage's Station. I cannot close this sketch without referring to the Confederate commander
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