hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 274 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 162 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 126 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 118 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 91 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 88 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 85 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 61 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 56 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 49 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for William Mahone or search for William Mahone in all documents.

Your search returned 43 results in 4 document sections:

e of intrenchments. denial that General Lee consulted General Mahone concerning the location of the line. details of Gener interfere with the movements of the troops. Consults General Mahone with reference to the position of second Swamp and theent of his defence, he called to his assistance Major-General William Mahone, an officer in whom he reposed great confidence the town. General Lee did not at any time consult General Mahone with reference to the Taylor's Creek and Jerusalem plasive lines, when their sites were so plainly visible. General Mahone may have been a good and experienced civil engineer, bce in the field under trying circumstances. Where had General Mahone acquired skill by such practice General Lee consulte offensive. It was upon this point that he consulted General Mahone, who had been the civil engineer and builder of the No country over which our forces would have to operate. General Mahone was of General Lee's opinion, and the suggested plan w
raw. General Meade issues it. arrival of General Mahone with part of his division. Throws forwardade. its repulse. combined attack under Generals Mahone and Johnson. slight resistance on the pad fearing to retreat—when, at ten o'clock, General Mahone arrived with a part of his men, who lay doederals which seemed to menace an advance, General Mahone threw forward his brigade with the 61st Noarolina, all under Smith, which were formed on Mahone's left, likewise joined in the counter-movemenetached and pushed forward, separately, by General Mahone, to drive the Federals out of the crater, his fire, a combined movement of the forces of Mahone and Johnson was prepared, ordered by Generals Lee and Beauregard. Saunders's brigade of Mahone's division, with the 61st North Carolina, of Hoke's on the left and rear of the crater, under General Mahone; and the 23d and part of the 22d South Carsive of 22 men belonging to Pegram's battery. Mahone's division lost 250 men—killed, wounded, and m[1 more...]<
General A. P. Hill, who commanded the Confederate forces against Warren's expedition, mistook the exact position of the enemy's line on the left, and, through General Mahone, who labored under the same error, Hagood's brigade was ordered to press the rear and flank of the Federals. He was to be supported by five brigades of MahonMahone's division, supposed to be already in front. The brigade drove the skirmishers from their rifle-pits, but found itself in presence of a strongly intrenched line, crowded with men and artillery, extending right and left as far as could be seen. General Hagood's Memoirs. See Appendix. The five brigades of General Mahone were General Mahone were not there. General Hagood saw at once how perilous a strait he was in, and used his utmost endeavors to halt his command; but the men, intent on carrying the position before them, neither heard nor heeded his voice, Ibid. and had actually reached the parapets of the works before they understood what overwhelming disaster threa
e engaged for a time on Taylor's Creek. General Mahone's command arrived about 10 o'clock A. M., en given, by some one publishing his views, to Mahone's division. I think this has been rebutted byA short time after I first met General J., General Mahone came up with a few men. From my present reh he could collect and formed on line with General Mahone. I think the charge was made about 12 oand never could advance a step farther; and if Mahone had never come up the enemy's only chance wouljor-general rode up, announcing himself as General Mahone. Then, leading the column, this officer hartillery and infantry, was then going on. General Mahone added, When you have crossed the branch swm, and only in rifle-pits, thus confirming General Mahone's statement, Hagood, cautioning his men tove Confederate attacking brigades of which General Mahone had spoken nowhere visible. It also appe error until Hagood's attack developed it. General Mahone also said to Hagood that he shared the sam[11 more...]