Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Mahone or search for Mahone in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
in the attack there, following up as near as possible the direction of the Emmetsburg road. My corps occupied our right, with Hood on our extreme right and McLaws next. Hill's corps was next to mine, in front of the Federal centre, and Ewell was on our extreme left. My corps, with Pickett's division absent, numbered hardly 13,000 men. I realized that the fight was to be a fearful one; but being assured that my flank would be protected by the brigades of Wilcox, Perry, Wright, Posey, and Mahone moving en echelon, and that Ewell was to co-operate by a direct attack on the enemy's right, and Hill to threaten his centre and attack if opportunity offered and thus prevent reinforcements from being launched either against myself or Ewell, it seemed that we might possibly dislodge the great army in front of us. At half-past 3 o'clock the order was given General Hood to advance upon the enemy, and, hurrying to the head of McLaw's divison, I moved with his line. Then was fairly commenced w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Flanner's North Carolina battery at the battle of the Crater. (search)
deadly fire poured into their ranks. Their lines were then broken, and they fled to the works and there remained until our infantry, composed of the brigades of Mahone, Girardy, and Sanders, all under the command of Mahone, arrived, and were placed in position preparatory to making the final charge, which resulted in the recaptuMahone, arrived, and were placed in position preparatory to making the final charge, which resulted in the recapture of the works about 2 o'clock in the day. The fire of the enemy, from nearly one hundred guns, was concentrated upon my company for two hours; but amid this terrible rain of deadly missiles these brave North Carolinians stood to their guns and repulsed every advance made by the enemy, holding them in check alone, and without infantry support, until the arrival of General Beauregard with the troops commanded by Mahone before mentioned. We claim the honor of saving the day, and preventing what might have been a very serious disaster and probable loss of Petersburg. No onre save those who went through the fiery ordeal can form the slightest concep