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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
ulia's devoted friend and chief adviser, we shall speak later on. We have dwelt upon the generation preceding our mother's, because all these people, the beautiful mother so early lost, so long loved and mourned, the sternly devoted father, the vivacious aunts, the stalwart uncles, were strong influences in the life of Julia Ward. The amusements of the little Wards were few, compared with those of children of to-day. As a child of seven, Julia was taken twice to the opera, and heard Malibran, then Signorina Garcia, a pleasure the memory of which remained with her through life. About this time Mr. Ward's views of religious duty deepened in stringency and in gloom. There was no more opera, nor did Julia ever attend a theatre until she was a grown woman. In Low Church circles at that time, the drama was considered distinctly of the devil. The burning of the first Bowery Theatre and of the great theatre at Richmond, Virginia, were spoken of as judgments. Many an Evangelical pa
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
able husbands,... and lastly, that I might serve in some way until the last breath leaves my body.... December 16. I had greatly desired to see the Barber. kind Mrs. [Alfred] Batcheller made it possible by inviting me to go with her. The performance was almost if not quite bouffe. Sembrich's singing marvellous, the acting of the other characters excellent, and singing very good, especially that of de Reszke and Campanari. I heard the opera in New York more than seventy years ago, when Malibran, then Signorina Garcia, took the part of Rosina. December 31. ... Advertiser man came with a query: what event in 1899 will have the greatest influence in the world's history? I replied, the Czar's Peace Manifesto, leading to the Conference at the Hague. November, 1899, saw the birth of another Institution from which she was to derive much pleasure, the Boston Authors' Club. Miss Helen M. Winslow first evolved the idea of such a Club. After talking with Mmes. May Alden Ward and Mab
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
her hand waving farewell, one could only think of The chariot of Israel and the horsemen thereof. Another good gift was a Victor machine. When the after-dinner reading was over, she would say, Now bring my opera-box! The white armchair was wheeled into the passage between the two parlors. Here she sat in state, while the great singers poured out their treasures before her, while violinist and pianist gave her their best. She listened with keen and critical enjoyment, recalling how Malibran gave this note, how Grisi and Mario sang that duet. Then she would go to the piano and play from memory airs from Tancredi, I1 Pirata, Richard Coeur de lion, and other operas known to us only through her. Or she would — always without notes — play the Barber of Seville almost from beginning to end, with fingers still deft and nimble. She loved the older operas best. After an air from Don Giovanni, she would say, Mozart must be in heaven: they could never get on without him! She thoug
e, II, 26. Macready, W. C., I, 87. McTavish, Mrs., II, 249. Madrid, I, 328; II, 243, 353. Maggi, Count, Alberto, I, 255. Mailliard, Adolphe, I, 117, 135; II, 222. Mailliard, Annie, I, 18, 21, 30, 34-36, 54, 58, 60, 78-81, 83-85, 93, 117, 134, 135, 137, 157, 200, 240, 241; II, 67, 94, 131, 135, 155, 202, 203, 216, 235. Letters to, 107-09, 117, 118, 122-25, 127, 131-33, 137, 142, 159-62, 164-72, 184. Maine, I, 392; II, 122. Maine, Sir H. J. Sumner, I, 249, 250. Malibran, Mme. de, (Maria Felicita Garcia), I, 29; II, 270, 350. Mallock, W. H., II, 8. Mammoth Cave, II, 122. Manatt, E., II, 293. Mancini, Sig., II, 172. Manhattan, I, 243. Manila, Battle of, II, 254. Mann, Horace, I, 73, 79, 83, 94, 121, 123, 169, 185, 227. Mann, Mary P., I, 79, 80, 169. Manning, H. E., II, 165. Mansfield, I, 378. Mansfield, Richard, II, 8, 313. Mansion House, II, 8. Mapleson, Col., II, 103. Margherita, Queen, II, 30, 248, 277. Marie, Pete