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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 23 11 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 4 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 13: the Jesuits. (search)
of our great amusements, and our theatre is popular with the young men in our college, and with young and old men beyond our gates. We sing operettas, and trip through farces and conversation pieces. We are fond of picturesque dances, which Father Mallon, one of our French professors, puts on the stage with an artistic eye. Of course, we suffer from the lack of female help, but Father Mallon dresses up his boys in skirt and bodice, so that folks before the curtain think them rather pretty girFather Mallon dresses up his boys in skirt and bodice, so that folks before the curtain think them rather pretty girls. He gets the freshest music from Paris, and we are very rich just now in that of Monsieur Lecocq. But we are capable of higher things than acting Furnished Apartments; we have tried our luck at Hamlet, and have played Macbeth with some applause. Shakspeare is our poet, though we cannot put Othello on the stage so easily as we can Cherry Bounce. The library is mixed, yet many of the books are new. Unlike the Trappists, says Padre Varsi, smiling, we arm ourselves with books instead of r
ting as fiercely as if they had not, for three hours, already faced the extremest fury of the storm. The Mississipians, with a brigade of Virginians were seen to move forward to complete their victory. So close to the feeble remnants of the broken Third Corps are they that they almost intermingle. The little line in blue opens on them and checked the foremost a little until a rebel battery is run forward and opens fire. Being subjected also to an enfilading fire, Col. Devereux says to Col. Mallon: Order your men to stand up, fire a volley by the rear and front rank and you will clean out those in front of you and stop them. Then face about, go back to the old line on double-quick, face about again and wait for the Nineteenth. It was a desperate situation in more ways than one. The slightest delay meant risk of capture, but to stop the onward march of the enemy's lines on to the shattered forces must be done if possible. Then, above all, there is the importance of getting the
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 30: Pickett's charge. (search)
shirt, is yelling down his line and a regiment of Ewell's corps, entangled with his force, passes captive to the rear. Mallon! We must move! shouts Col. Devereux to his friend, the commander of the Forty-Second New York. Just then a headlong russsion to move his regiment to right and to the front, where the line had broken. I granted it, and his regiment, and Colonel Mallon's 42d New York volunteers, on his right, proceeded there at once. Shouting in a characteristic manner—Now, men, fs horse falls dead and Hunt bounds to his feet, firing his pistols in the very faces of the yelling foe. Meanwhile, Col. Mallon has sprung forward to his men and instantly the Nineteenth Massachusetts and the Forty-Second New York are moving sideed everywhere, most of the men of the Nineteenth gathered about its colors, thus, in a measure, holding its identity. Col. Mallon and the Forty-Second New York had by this time wrapped around the right of the grove a little. The opposing lines wer
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 31: after the battle. (search)
ssachusetts, accompanied by the Forty Second New York (Colonel Mallon) to support Humphrey's Division, which held the right s yet unsettled, right of seniority between myself and Colonel Mallon, but which never interfered with our cordial personal to trust to my own judgement. I formed a line of battle, Mallon on my right, and ordered both regiments to lie down, offic all the broken fragments of our troops, then directed Colonel Mallon to make his men stand up, fire a volley by the rear anear, then to halt, face about again and wait for me. After Mallon had well left the field, I ordered my men to rise and firehrough, halted and again faced to the front by the side of Mallon's Forty-Second New York. I consider no men could have bee it. I marched them back in this order, unable to tell how Mallon had reached the old ground, totally unaware of the arrival put my troops in there. I was told to get in quick. Colonel Mallon was near me, and I ordered him to put his regiment in
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 33: the advance to Culpepper and Bealton. (search)
sion, commanded by Gen. Webb, with two batteries of artillery, taking the northwesterly side of the railroad; the Third Division, under Gen. Alexander Hayes, taking the south-easterly side, and the First Division, under Caldwell as rear guard. Col. Mallon commanded the third brigade of the Second Division, in which was the Nineteenth, commanded by Col. Wass. The column moved rapidly on, every man intent on getting as far ahead as possible. There was no voluntary straggling. Of the battle aenormously disproportionate to the forces engaged. The loss of the enemy in front of the regiment was greater than the total number of men in the Nineteenth. The strength of the regiment in this engagement was but 190 officers and men. Colonel Mallon of the Forty-Second New York, commanding the brigade, had been killed early in the action and the command of the brigade devolved upon Lieut. Col. Wass, of the Nineteenth Massachusetts. In relating the incidents of the battle, General Walk
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
. Aug. 12, ‘63; capt. V. R.C. Aug. 12, ‘63. Mahnitz, Adolph, priv., (A), Apr. 7, 1862; 21; re-en. Dec. 21, 1863; M. O. June 30, 1865 in Co. B as abs. wounded. Mahoney, Daniel, priv., (G), June 3, ‘64; 27; sub. Enos Harmon, abs. pris. Oct. 25, ‘64. Maida, John, priv., (E), July 25, ‘61; 27; died Sept. 29, ‘62, Washington, D. C. Maley, John, priv., (H), July 31, ‘63; 20; sub. N. D. Fox; M. O. June 30, ‘65; has been pris. Mallard, Asa M., priv., (G), Aug. 19, ‘61; 34; M. O. Aug. 28, ‘64. Mallon, John E., priv., (G), June 7, ‘64; 19; transf. to V. R.C. Sept. 15, ‘64, 2nd Batt. V. R.C. (disch. paper). Maloney, Edward, priv., (H), Oct. 27, ‘61; 18; transf. to Co. E, Sept. or Oct. ‘62; disch. July 10, ‘65 as of Co. E. Maloney, John, priv., (1), Aug. 13, ‘61; 22; deserted Mar. 10, ‘62. Maloney, John, priv., (I), Aug. 26, ‘61; 21; N. F.R. Maloney, William, priv., (C), Jan. 16, ‘65; 23; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Mann, John, priv., (G), Aug. 28, ‘61; 21;
..................................... 337 Maguire, Edward,........................................... 105 Mahnitz, Adolph,.................................................. 265, 285 Mahoney, Andrew, 1, 2, 4, 7, 170, 181, 182, 188, 192, 199, 200, 201, 223, 231, 258 Mahoney, D.,........................................................ 352 Mahoney, Ed. (E),.................................................... 203 Maley, Richard,..................................................... 106 Mallon, Colonel,.................................... 230, 239, 240, 252, 271 Maloney, Edward,............................................. 1... 152, 270 Maloney, Edwin C.,..................................... 286 Malvern Hill,.................................................93, 98, 99, 114 Manchester, Va.,...................................................... 337 Mann, John,..................................................... 107, 249 Manning, Peter,............................................
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 9 (search)
the Third Corps (now under General Birney) in addition to his own. The attack on Humphreys was so sudden and severe, that two additional regiments (the Nineteenth Massachusetts, under Colonel Devereux, and the Forty-second New York, under Colonel Mallon), which Hancock had sent out to his assistance, finding that Humphreys was retiring, could only get quickly into line of battle, deliver a few volleys at the advancing enemy, and then retire with a considerable loss. The enemy pushed them soion, First Corps, participated. and Colonel Devereux, commanding the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, anxious to be in the right place, applied for permission to move his regiment to the front—a request gladly granted by Hancock, who also gave Mallon's Forty-second New York Regiment the same direction; while Colonel Stannard moved two regiments of his Vermont brigade to strike the enemy on the right flank. These movements were quickly executed, but not without confusion, owing to many men le
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 10 (search)
d just in time to meet Hill's advancing line of battle, which, receiving a severe fire from the troops covered by the cut and embankment, and raked by the fire of Ricketts' battery, fell back with heavy loss. Warren immediately advanced a thin line in pursuit, and secured four hundred and fifty prisoners, two standards, and five pieces of artillery. The attack fell mainly on the First and Third brigades of General Webb's division—the former commanded by Colonel Heath, and the latter by General Mallon, an accomplished and patriotic officer who was killed in the action—and on the Third Brigade of General Hays' divis on, commanded by General Owen. The division of General Caldwell, which had formed the rear-guard, came up for a mile or two on the run, and took position on the left of Hays; but the action had already been decided. Warren's loss was comparatively slight. Effectual as was the check which Warren had given Hill, the position of the former was not one in which he could re
cut almost perfectly sheltering the men, and behind an embankment forming equally good protection. Hays' division, consisting of the brigades of Smyth, Carroll and Owen, held the center. On his right was Webb's division, made up of Heath's and Mallon's brigades—Baxter not being present. Caldwell's division was on Hays' left, but the Confederate front was not long enough to reach his position, and only his skirmishers were engaged. Miles' brigade of Caldwell's division was supporting the artillery. The Federal brigades most severely engaged were those of Heath, Mallon and Owen. Against these two divisions the two North Carolina brigades, under the protest of General Cooke, gallantly advanced. General Heth says of the Federal position: On seeing our advance, the enemy formed his line in rear of the railroad embankment, his right resting on Broad run and hidden by a railroad cut. In his rear, a line of hills ascended to some 30 or 40 feet in height, giving him an admirable posit