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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Stephen Russell Mallory or search for Stephen Russell Mallory in all documents.

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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
t of State—Mr. Robert Toombs, of Georgia; Department of War—Mr. Leroy P. Walker, of Alabama; the Treasury Department—Mr. Charles G. Memminger, of South Carolina; the Post—office Department—Mr. John H. Reagan, of Texas; the Navy Department—Mr. Stephen R. Mallory, of Florida; the Department of Justice—Mr. Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana. Questions of inter-state commerce somewhat perplexing in their nature demanded immediate solution by the Confederate government. Among them, the most importan change in the objects of coercion. During the debate on the general conscription bill pending an amendment offered by Mr. Cox, of Ohio, That no one shall be enrolled under this act except able bodied white male citizens of the United States, Mr. Mallory, of Kentucky, said, Why is this measure called for at this time? The answer is one which is very galling to the pride of the administration and its supporters. It is a complete confession of incompetency to manage the stupendous war i
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
al months. After his release he resumed his law practice at New Orleans, 1866, enjoyed the esteem of his people, and died at Baltimore March 12, 1889. Stephen Russell Mallory Stephen Russell Mallory, secretary of the navy, was born in Trinidad, West Indies, in 1813, son of Charles Mallory, of Connecticut, who settled at Key Stephen Russell Mallory, secretary of the navy, was born in Trinidad, West Indies, in 1813, son of Charles Mallory, of Connecticut, who settled at Key West in 1820. He was educated at Mobile, and at Nazareth, Penn., and when nineteen years old was appointed inspector of customs at Key West. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1839; was judge of Monroe county and judge of probate; and in 1845 was appointed collector of customs at Key West. He served as a soldier in th In 1861 he resigned his commission as lieutenant, was commissioned lieutenant, C. S. N., and assigned to the ordnance department. He submitted drawings to Secretary Mallory of an iron-clad war vessel with submerged ends, and had charge of devising, preparing and testing the armor and ordnance for the famous Virginia. He was sub